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Physical Activity

Physical Activity and Exercise for Diabetics: Diabetes in Control answers key questions about the uses and challenges of physical for diabetes management, including:
– How physical activity affects diabetes patients
– How/when a healthcare professional should or should not use exercise as a treatment for diabetic patients
– What does a healthcare professional needs to know to enhance the safety of physical activity for diabetes patients

How to Address Those Nagging Joint Injuries and Pain

By Sheri Colberg, PhD
In late 2017, one of my columns addressed whether you can determine if your joint issues are related to being active, normal aging, or diabetes. The answer was that you really couldn't determine the exact cause(s), but any or all of them may be contributors. Does it matter more if you know the underlying cause if you can figure out the best treatment?

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Sure, You May Lose Weight, But Will Going Low-Carb Impact Your Performance? 

By Sheri Colberg, PhD
With the new year upon us and resolutions made, weight loss may be on your mind, and with it, low-carb eating is one possible way to cut back on calories. Before you decide how to go about losing weight, though, you may want to consider how cutting back on your carbohydrate intake may affect your ability to be physically active.

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Be Physically Active to Boost Your Immune Response

By Sheri Colberg, PhD
In these challenging times, if we only could get a medication that would boost our immune system and response to viruses, lower all stress associated with being in a pandemic, and treat most of the pre-existing health conditions that are associated with a higher risk of dying from COVID-19, we would all be lined up for it! Guess what? We already have something that does all these things already.

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Pumping Up with Protein: Does This Work for Exercise and Health?

By Sheri Colberg, PhD
Protein is never a key exercise fuel, but it’s critical for other reasons. During most exercise, protein contributes less than 5 percent of the total energy, although it may rise to 10 to 15 percent during a prolonged event like a marathon or Ironman triathlon. Taking in enough dietary protein is important because dietary protein allows your muscles to be repaired after exercise and promotes the synthesis of hormones, enzymes, and other body tissues formed from amino acids, the building blocks of protein.

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