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Disasters Averted

Disasters Averted are stories submitted by our readers and medical editors from direct experience in the field. Do you have a story? If your story is used, we will send you a $25 Amazon Gift Card! Submissions can be anonymous.

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Clear, Written Instructions Can Help Avert Medical Mistakes

I have a patient I introduced to using Lantus insulin (including why, injection technique, storage, etc.). She would then see her family doctor, get the prescription and return the next week to review titration and any new questions before she started. I saw her a week later at our supervised diabetes walking group. She reported that she had started using the insulin three days prior and started at ten units and stated she was now 20 units! (She had only had two doses). 

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Patient’s Renewed Commitment to Low BG’s Leads to “Keytones” Clarity

I recently received a text message from a type 1 patient who has been wearing a pump for over ten years. 

"I need your guidance. My blood sugars have been in the high 200s and 300s since Thursday. I woke up with a 398 blood sugar. I've been eating out a lot and drinking too much. I need to follow a rigorous low carb diet and less alcohol." I called the patient and let her know I was sorry to hear she was feeling overwhelmed....

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Using Pens – Keep It In and Hold It Down!

Susan received a phone call from her clinician's office recommending that she start using a pen for her insulin. She had also been prescribed a GLP-1 receptor agonist and was to go to the pharmacy to pick them up.
She went and signed up for the long 'discourse' patients receive when they pick up new meds including questions such as whether or not the pharmacist had offered instructions and pages of small print. She, like many of our patients, signed the sheets and went on her own way without ever talking to a pharmacist or asking a question.

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Using Newer Glucagon Products

Newer glucagon products provide additional options for the treatment of severe hypoglycemia.

We were asked to consult on a case involving a 68-year-old man with type 1 diabetes (T1D). He recently experienced a severe hypoglycemic event resulting in hospitalization. The patient currently lives independently with his wife of 40 years and has had T1D since the age of 12....

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