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Catherine Champagne Part 5, Takeaway Message From Fad Diet Presentation




In part 5 of this Exclusive Interview, Catherine Champagne talks with Diabetes in Control Publisher Steve Freed about findings regarding coconut oil and low calorie sweeteners.

Catherine M. Champagne, PhD, RDN, LDN, FADA, FAND, FTOS  is a professor at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University.

 

Transcript of this video segment:

Freed: So what is the takeaway message that you wanted the standing room only audience to take away. Because when you do a presentation you prepare for a presentation. You want it to be meaningful. You don’t want to just talk to them. People will forget everything that you said; you know you want them to walk out of the hall with their notes and say I’ve got to make these changes.

Champagne: Well we did not really talk about changes people needed to make. Frankly I was quite surprised at how many people were at the session. Probably close to 600 people. We talked about some faddish issues;  one of them is saturated fat. Because saturated fat increases your risk of cardiovascular disease and there is a currently a big hype about coconut oil but coconut oil in and of itself is a saturated fat. And in fact the data on coconut oil seems to be, typically — compared to medium chain triglyceride oil, and it is different in that medium chain triglyceride oil has higher levels of caproic and caprylic acid as opposed to coconut oil which has lauric acid, which is a very long chain highly saturated fat. So I would like for them to take home that message, because you know although the evidence is in cardiovascular disease one of the key problems that affects the mortality of a person with diabetes is cardiovascular disease, so you know it’s a win win if you don’t consume coconut oil.

We also talked about low calorie sweeteners and I just went to a presentation on low calorie sweeteners so I’m going to have to rethink that one; when I say the nutrition landscape is changing. Sometimes we get data on things like low calorie sweeteners that makes us step back and say well, how much should we be consuming? And I think most of the data suggests that most people with diabetes consume lower than the adequate daily intakes of low calorie sweeteners. And since 2008 there has not been data showing that it’s necessarily bad for someone with diabetes, but probably I would say that they should focus on water.

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