Monday , October 23 2017
Home / Resources / Articles / What A Can of Coca-Cola Really Does To Your Body

What A Can of Coca-Cola Really Does To Your Body

Soda stimulates the brain’s reward and pleasure centers similarly to heroin….

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the recommended daily allowance for sugar consumption is no more than 6 teaspoons per a day. A 12-oz can of Coca-Cola contains about 10 teaspoon of sugar. The high amounts of fructose corn syrup, refined salts, and caffeine found in soda contributes to high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity when regularly consumed. Those who drink 1-2 cans of sugary beverages a day are 26% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

Within 20 minutes of consuming a 12-oz can of Coca-Cola, blood sugar levels spike, which causes a burst of insulin release. Caffeine absorption is complete after 40 minutes causing blood pressure to rise and adenosine receptors in the brain to be blocked, which prevents drowsiness.

Dopamine production is increased after 45 minutes of consumption to stimulate the reward and pleasure center of the brain, similarly to how heroin works. The phosphoric acid, which masks the sweetness of the soda, also binds to calcium, magnesium, and zinc, preventing them from being absorbed and utilized for processes such as bone growth.

After an hour, the diuretic effects of caffeine kicks in causing urinary excretion of the bonded calcium, magnesium, and zinc, as well as sodium, electrolyte, and water. Finally, a sugar crash occurs, causing irritability and drowsiness.

This process occurs not only for Coca-Cola, but for all caffeinated carbonated beverages. However, this does not mean that soda should be completely banned from your diet. Soda consumption will not do any major harm in small amounts when part of a balanced diet and lifestyle. Like everything else, the key is moderation.

Practice Pearls:

  • A 12-oz can of Coca-Cola contains about 10 teaspoon of sugar. That one can of soda has more sugar in it than recommended by the World Health Organization for an entire day.
  • The high amounts of fructose corn syrup, refined salts, and caffeine found in soda contributes to high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity when regularly consumed.
  • Those who drink 1-2 cans of sugary beverages a day are 26% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

“Consumption of Sugary Drinks in the United States, 2005-2008,” accessed 31 July 2015. Additional source: Harvard School of Public Health, “Soft Drinks and Disease,” accessed 31 July 2015.