Home / Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM

Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM

Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM
(Advisory Board Member) Sheri Colberg, PhD, also known as Sheri Colberg-Ochs, is an author, exercise physiologist, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University and a former adjunct professor of internal medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School, both in Norfolk, Virginia. Having earned her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, she has specialized in research on diabetes and exercise and healthy lifestyles and shaped physical activity recommendations for professional organizations, including the American College of Sports Medicine, American Diabetes Association, and American Association of Diabetes Educators. She has authored 11 books, along with 24 book chapters and more than 300 articles on physical activity, diabetes, healthy lifestyles, and aging. In addition to her educational website, Diabetes Motion (www.diabetesmotion.com), she is also the founder of an academy for fitness and other professionals seeking continuing education enabling them to effectively work with people with diabetes and exercise: Diabetes Motion Academy (www.dmacademy.com). These and her own website (www.shericolberg.com) offer additional information about being active with diabetes. She is the 2016 recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award.

Pumping Up with Protein: Does This Work for Exercise and Health?

By Sheri Colberg, PhD
Protein is never a key exercise fuel, but it’s critical for other reasons. During most exercise, protein contributes less than 5 percent of the total energy, although it may rise to 10 to 15 percent during a prolonged event like a marathon or Ironman triathlon. Taking in enough dietary protein is important because dietary protein allows your muscles to be repaired after exercise and promotes the synthesis of hormones, enzymes, and other body tissues formed from amino acids, the building blocks of protein.

Read More »

Regaining Physical Fitness in A Post-Pandemic World

By Sheri Colberg, PhD
Yes, I know we're still dealing with a life-changing pandemic around the world and especially in most areas of the United States, but it is still worth thinking ahead to what comes next. Despite our discussion last month on non-gym fitness trends, it is more than likely that many of us have experienced a change (most often a decrease) in our daily physical activities and, subsequently, in our aerobic and muscular fitness levels.

Read More »

Exercising with Type 1 Diabetes: The Insulin-Food Balance Challenge 

by Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM
Addressing how to balance blood glucose levels during (and after) exercise with type 1 diabetes is not new. In fact, it is likely the KEY topic to address to be successful at being physically active if you take exogenous insulin and want to prevent hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia during exercise. Strategies include changing in insulin doses and/or supplementing with food, either of which can be done in myriad ways depending on the activity, timing and more.

Read More »

5 Key Exercises for People with Diabetes 

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD
It pays to get your core muscles — the muscles around your trunk and pelvis — in better shape, if only to keep your balance.  Having a strong body core means you’ll be better able to manage any physical undertaking, even just grocery shopping or a round of golf.  What’s more, core exercises are an important part of a well-rounded fitness program including aerobic and resistance workouts, and they’re easy to do at home on your own.  

Read More »

Manage Your Stress with Some At-Home Flexibility Exercises 

By Sheri Colberg, PhD 

Feeling stressed out by the pandemic or by being trapped at home with no end in sight? If you’re a regular exerciser like me, the closure of gyms and fitness centers in most parts of the country may be limiting your options to de-stress by being active. Take a few minutes each day and work on your flexibility with these simple exercises you can do at home.

Read More »

10 Ways to Get Motivated to Exercise (When You’re Not) 

By Sheri Colberg, PhD 
Diabetes is a complex metabolic condition, and your blood glucose levels can impact you not only physically but also emotionally and mentally. Often, feeling depressed or anxious about diabetes management can be demotivating for taking better care of yourself. Whether that care involves getting more physically active or making more healthful food choices, getting and staying more motivated can only benefit you and your blood glucose. 

Read More »