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Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM

Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM
(Advisory Board Member) Sheri Colberg, PhD, also known as Sheri Colberg-Ochs, is an author, exercise physiologist, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University and a former adjunct professor of internal medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School, both in Norfolk, Virginia. Having earned her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, she has specialized in research on diabetes and exercise and healthy lifestyles and shaped physical activity recommendations for professional organizations, including the American College of Sports Medicine, American Diabetes Association, and American Association of Diabetes Educators. She has authored 11 books, along with 24 book chapters and more than 300 articles on physical activity, diabetes, healthy lifestyles, and aging. In addition to her educational website, Diabetes Motion (www.diabetesmotion.com), she is also the founder of an academy for fitness and other professionals seeking continuing education enabling them to effectively work with people with diabetes and exercise: Diabetes Motion Academy (www.dmacademy.com). These and her own website (www.shericolberg.com) offer additional information about being active with diabetes. She is the 2016 recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award.

Aiming for an Ideal Exercise Blood Glucose

Dr. Sheri Colberg on Avoid Weight Gain from Insulin Use and Treating Lows

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM

There is no official ideal blood glucose range to start with and maintain during physical activity, but we do know that being too low negatively impacts performance, as does being too high. As for what blood glucose target or range most athletes aim for, it depends on a number of factors, including the type, intensity, and duration of their activity. A consensus statement about exercise and type 1 diabetes published in The Lancet in 2017 suggested that a reasonable target for most people doing aerobic exercise lasting up to an hour is 126 to 180 mg/dL (7.0 to 10.0 mmol/L), only aiming higher for added protection against lows in some situations.

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Insulin Pump Use and Exercise Strategies

Dr. Sheri Colberg on Avoid Weight Gain from Insulin Use and Treating Lows

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM

Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, if you use insulin, you may choose to use a specialized insulin pump for both your basal and bolus insulin delivery. Pumps have a small catheter placed under your skin and are programmed to cover your basal insulin needs by delivering small doses of fast-acting insulin to mimic normal insulin release by the pancreas. Insulin pumps are programmed to deliver small, basal doses of fast-acting insulin to mimic normal insulin release by the pancreas throughout the day. These pumps are not ideal for everyone, and the choice to use one should be an individual one.

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Brain Hormones and Relaxation to Lower Mental and Physical Stress

Dr. Sheri Colberg on Avoid Weight Gain from Insulin Use and Treating Lows

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM
At each dawn of a new year, many people make resolutions to be more physically active—only to fail in changing their lifestyle habits in a sustained manner. Don’t be one of the many who start exercising only to stop again a few months later. Read more about why daily release of feel-good brain hormones is so important and why you should learn how to relax more as well.

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Updated Federal Physical Activity Guidelines: Do They Apply to People with Diabetes?

Dr. Sheri Colberg on Avoid Weight Gain from Insulin Use and Treating Lows

In mid-November 2018, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services finally released new physical activity guidelines (as a 2nd edition) to update their previous set from a decade before. Various activity guidelines for adults with diabetes have been updated several times in the interim, including a 2010 position statement on exercising with type 2 diabetes published jointly by the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association; a 2016 ADA position statement on exercise and physical activity for all types of diabetes; and a consensus statement on being active with type 1 diabetes published in The Lancet in 2017.

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Always Have a Backup Plan to Be Active

A 60-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes and no serious health complications began an exercise program as part of a research study. It involved doing an hour of moderate aerobic exercise three days per week in a supervised setting (at a local Y). She showed up to all the training sessions, stating about a month into the 12-week training program that she was so happy to be active again, that she felt so much better physically and mentally and felt like she had “found herself” again.

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Can Exercise Overcome Environmental Impacts like Pollution on Diabetes Risk?

Dr. Sheri Colberg on Avoid Weight Gain from Insulin Use and Treating Lows

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM
It's known that lack of exercise, poor eating habits, genetics, and lifestyle factors can all contribute to the onset of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. I have spent many years touting the benefits of lifestyle change to prevent and manage these health conditions—and in some cases reverse them. Exercise is a particularly important lifestyle management tool because of its ability to lower inflammation (the underlying cause of insulin resistance) naturally.

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Engage in Cross-Training to Get More Fit

Dr. Sheri Colberg on Avoid Weight Gain from Insulin Use and Treating Lows

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM

If you’re like a lot of other people, you may get bored doing the same physical activities day after day. More than half of people who start exercise training programs drop out in the first six months. So, what you do to keep your workouts fresh sometimes matters more for getting the most out of training and staying with it. For these reasons (and more), you may want to consider doing cross-training.

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Using Diabetes Technologies Like CGM During Exercise

Dr. Sheri Colberg on Avoid Weight Gain from Insulin Use and Treating Lows

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM
A topic that comes up frequently nowadays is the use of diabetes technologies with exercise. When I surveyed close to 300 active individuals with diabetes, more than 60 percent used an insulin pump (which is well above the national average), but even more of these exercisers—over 75 percent—wear a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device (1). The technology fervor has grown even louder since the FDA recently granted approval in the United States to an implantable, three-month CGM sensor called Eversense (made by Senseonics). Can active people benefit from using these CGM and other devices, especially when active?

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