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Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM

Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM
(Advisory Board Member) Sheri Colberg, PhD, also known as Sheri Colberg-Ochs, is an author, exercise physiologist, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University and a former adjunct professor of internal medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School, both in Norfolk, Virginia. Having earned her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, she has specialized in research on diabetes and exercise and healthy lifestyles and shaped physical activity recommendations for professional organizations, including the American College of Sports Medicine, American Diabetes Association, and American Association of Diabetes Educators. She has authored 11 books, along with 24 book chapters and more than 300 articles on physical activity, diabetes, healthy lifestyles, and aging. In addition to her educational website, Diabetes Motion (www.diabetesmotion.com), she is also the founder of an academy for fitness and other professionals seeking continuing education enabling them to effectively work with people with diabetes and exercise: Diabetes Motion Academy (www.dmacademy.com). These and her own website (www.shericolberg.com) offer additional information about being active with diabetes. She is the 2016 recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award.

Using Diabetes Technologies Like CGM During Exercise

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM
A topic that comes up frequently nowadays is the use of diabetes technologies with exercise. When I surveyed close to 300 active individuals with diabetes, more than 60 percent used an insulin pump (which is well above the national average), but even more of these exercisers—over 75 percent—wear a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device (1). The technology fervor has grown even louder since the FDA recently granted approval in the United States to an implantable, three-month CGM sensor called Eversense (made by Senseonics). Can active people benefit from using these CGM and other devices, especially when active?

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Going Low-Carb as an Athlete with Diabetes

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by Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM

There has been a lot of interest recently in going “low-carb” to better manage diabetes, particularly type 1. At present, a large clinical study is being undertaken in Scandinavia to examine the effects of very low-carb eating on blood glucose levels in adults with type 1 diabetes. For years, a very low-carb diet championed by Dr. Bernstein has been the main one followed by some with diabetes, until the last decade when fad weight loss plans like the LCHF (low-carb, high-fat, or Keto) and Paleo Diets have been become mainstream not just for losing weight, but also for their purported ability to boost to athletic performance and improve blood glucose management. All these eating plans are very low in carbohydrates, but differ in the types of non-carb macronutrients or foods they recommend.

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Why Being Physically Active Does a Body Good

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM

How active are you? Unless you’re exercising more than several hours a day already, you probably have room to add more in for additional health benefits. Exercise is about the best medicine that there is for so many health conditions, including diabetes. Being active helps manage emotional stress and stave off depression—far better than antidepressant medications and with no bad side effects. It naturally bestows your body with antioxidant effect, making you less likely to develop most types of cancer—or even the common cold.

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Motivational Tips for Getting and Staying Fit

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD
You may have started the new year out with the best of intentions to increase your fitness and better manage your diabetes by exercising regularly. If you have diabetes or are at risk for developing the disease, deciding to commit to fitness could be a real lifesaver. That’s why it’s more important than ever that you make sure this decision sticks. Here are some motivational tips for getting started being more active.

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Get off the Couch and Work Your Core: 10 Exercises for Core Fitness

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD

If you suffer from diabetes, you already know that staying fit greatly benefits your health. Yet, many of the complications caused by diabetes can make it difficult to get the exercise you need; in fact, they can make a normal exercise routine difficult or even dangerous. For example, peripheral neuropathy (numbness in the feet caused by nerve damage) may affect your balance and put you at risk for a fall, or could lead to slow-healing ulcers that keep you inactive. On top of that, diabetes patients may have heart disease symptoms or vision problems that make getting up and going for a walk more risky than helpful.

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There’s a New Diabetes Website in Town

Decades ago, going to an International Diabetic Athletes Association (IDAA) meeting in 1990 helped shaped the future direction of my career in diabetes and exercise. I remember talking with people about managing blood glucose with type 1 diabetes during activities of varying types and intensities, and my interest in compiling such useful information led to my first book attempting to create a guide for exercisers with diabetes in 2001. IDAA later became the Diabetes Exercise & Sports Association (DESA), and it later combined with InsulinDependence.org. Sadly, all those organizations are now defunct, the latest casualties of money problems that many not-for-profit organizations have experienced of late.

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Exercise to Lower Your Risk of Dying (Prematurely) with Type 1 Diabetes

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD: Much of the research on length of life for individuals living with type 1 diabetes is pessimistic, which makes a new study released recently a breath of fresh air. Data were collected for the ongoing nationwide, multicenter, Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study that tracked the death rate of 2,639 study participants.

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Are My Joint Issues Due to Being Active, Normal Aging, or Diabetes?

Living with diabetes often leads me to wonder if what I’m experiencing—particularly when it’s an irritated joint or an overuse injury—is a consequence of being a regularly physically active person, getting older, or having diabetes, or some combination of those. Which one of these is causing my joint issues? Is it possible to know? I will attempt to answer these questions based on my deeper dive into the published research.

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Sheri Colberg Current Interview

Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM is Professor Emerita of Exercise Science from Old Dominion University and an internationally recognized authority on diabetes and exercise. She is the author of 11 books, 24 book chapters, and over 300 articles. The author of "Exercise and Diabetes: A Clinician's Guide to Prescribing Physical Activity," published by ADA in 2013, she is also the lead author on a new ADA position statement on physical activity and diabetes published last fall. In 2016, she received the ADA Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award.

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