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Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM

(Advisory Board Member) Sheri Colberg, PhD, also known as Sheri Colberg-Ochs, is an author, exercise physiologist, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University and a former adjunct professor of internal medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School, both in Norfolk, Virginia. Having earned her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, she has specialized in research on diabetes and exercise and healthy lifestyles and shaped physical activity recommendations for professional organizations, including the American College of Sports Medicine, American Diabetes Association, and American Association of Diabetes Educators. She has authored 11 books, along with 24 book chapters and more than 300 articles on physical activity, diabetes, healthy lifestyles, and aging. In addition to her educational website, Diabetes Motion (www.diabetesmotion.com), she is also the founder of an academy for fitness and other professionals seeking continuing education enabling them to effectively work with people with diabetes and exercise: Diabetes Motion Academy (www.dmacademy.com). These and her own website (www.shericolberg.com) offer additional information about being active with diabetes. She is the 2016 recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award.

10 Ways to Get Motivated to Exercise (When You’re Not) 

By Sheri Colberg, PhD 
Diabetes is a complex metabolic condition, and your blood glucose levels can impact you not only physically but also emotionally and mentally. Often, feeling depressed or anxious about diabetes management can be demotivating for taking better care of yourself. Whether that care involves getting more physically active or making more healthful food choices, getting and staying more motivated can only benefit you and your blood glucose. 

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Getting and Staying Motivated to Be Physically Active

By Sheri Colberg, PhD
This time of year, all of the fitness clubs and gyms run specials to bring in new members, and they know—and even count on the fact that—most of those people will no longer be regularly attending classes or doing workouts by the time spring hits. How do you help your patients avoid joining those exercise dropouts? Here are some tips from our diabetes exercise expert that you can download in PDF format to hand out to your patients.

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Carbohydrate Loading: Effective If Done Right for Even a Day

By Sheri Colberg, PhD
What is a better topic to discuss after the gluttony most of us experience over the Thanksgiving and other fall/winter holidays than carbohydrate loading? (Actually, it probably should be excess calorie consumption in general, but you get the idea.) The following is excerpted from The Athlete’s Guide to Diabetes (2019) and gives you a better understanding of the topic from an exercise physiology (and diabetes) point of view.

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What Is the Best Time of Day to Exercise? The Answer Is…

By Sheri Colberg, PhD
I often get asked, “What is the best time of day to exercise?” Like most things related to physical activity—especially with diabetes as an added variable—the answer often is, “It depends.” What is your goal for being active? Are you trying to better balance your blood glucose, or is weight loss your goal? Do you take insulin? What is your normal diet? How much time do you have? Which activities? There are so many questions that likely need answering before you may be able to ascertain the best time for you personally to be active.

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What Causes Blood Glucose to Go Down or Up During Exercise

By Sheri Colberg, PhD

For all the time that I spend praising the “miracle” of being physically active to help better manage diabetes and health, there are times when exercising does lead to better managed blood glucose and times when it does not. It is not always possible to predict the glycemic outcomes in all cases either, although individual patterns and responses can be determined over time. It is helpful to know the main factors that are predictive of outcomes.

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Stay Hydrated Without Overhydrating for Exercise

by Sheri R. Colberg, PhD
Adequate fluid intake is essential to living well at any age, and being dehydrated can impact your health and your athletic endeavors. While it is harder to stay hydrated when exercising in the heat, you can dehydrate under other conditions—even during exercise in cold temperatures if you wear lots of clothing and sweat underneath it. As people grow older, they also begin to lose some of their normal thirst sensations, thereby increasing the risk for dehydration unless they make a conscious effort to drink more.

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Debunking Some Physical Activity and Training Myths

How often have you heard things about physical activity and exercise training that you thought sounded correct, but found out later they were totally wrong? If you hang out at a gym or even talk with training coaches, you’ll hear about everything, including contradictory statements about how to be active the right way. Should you work out in a “fat burning” range? Is weight training going to make you bulk up? Will your muscles turn to fat if you stop working out? Do you need to eat a lot more protein to get bigger muscles? Confused? Here is the truth about some of the more common myths you’ll hear about being active.

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Interpretation and Management of Hyperglycemia and Exercise

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM
In some circumstances, elevated blood glucose levels can be indicative of medical concerns like insulin deficiency. People with type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to insulin deficiency since they have almost no ability to produce any insulin; therefore, they need to receive instruction on why and when to check for ketones. This is especially important if the individual is using an insulin pump. If ketones are present, then the higher blood glucose levels are a result of insulin deficiency, and corrective action should be taken immediately.

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Can You Benefit from Using Exercise Technologies and Wearable Devices?

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM
What do you do when someone asks you to participate in a physical activity on the spur of the moment, but you just took some insulin? You may be stuck trying to compensate for this activity entirely with food, but you may have some newer options that come from technology. For starters, if you wear a pump you can choose to lower your basal insulin delivery, and you can use its insulin-on-board calculator to see how much insulin you need to offset with either insulin reductions or food intake. However, just using your blood glucose meter can help you stay on top of your glucose levels, so check often during the activity.

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