Tuesday , November 21 2017
Home / Conditions / Type 2 Diabetes / Exercise Difficulties In Older Women With Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise Difficulties In Older Women With Type 2 Diabetes

T2 patients had higher lactate levels and score higher on Rating of Perceived Exertion scale.

Regular physical activity plays an important part in type 2 diabetes management. However, according to a new study, older women with type 2 diabetes are generally sedentary due to a barrier to physical activity.

This study conducted by A.G. Huebschmann focused on the reason why many people with the disease are likely to be sedentary, and why people with type 2 diabetes have high risk of disability and mortality. There is no doubt that regular exercise can prevent premature disability and mortality.

In this cross-sectional study, a total of 54 overweight and sedentary women between 50 and 75 years of age with or without T2DM were enrolled. 26 participants had type 2 diabetes while 28 did not. All of them performed submaximal cycle ergometer exercise at 30W and individually measured peak oxygen consumption. Exercise effort was measured by the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion, which was reported by participants.

Compared with people without T2DM, people with T2DM showed lower VO2 peak (p=0.003) and greater lactate level (p=0.004 at 30W; p<0.05 at 35% VO2peak). Significantly higher lactate levels are related to a higher score on the rating of perceived exertion, which indicated how difficult people rate the exercise.

According to Huebschmann, “problems with metabolism and the body’s response to exercise may be an important driver behind both lower fitness levels and greater effort during exercise for people with diabetes.” People with T2DM tended to feel it was more difficult to perform common household activities. It may be related to the abnormalities with fuel metabolism in T2DM patients. Therefore, clinicians should encourage their patients to perform exercise at a pace that is personally comfortable.

Practice Pearls:

  • A cross-sectional study of older women with type 2 diabetes experienced a barrier to exercise, compared with their counterparts without diabetes.
  • Women with T2DM had higher lactate levels and score higher on the Rating of Perceived Exertion, which measures how difficult people rate the exercise.
  • Clinicians should encourage their patients perform exercise at a pace that is personally comfortable.

A G Huebschmann, W M Kohrt, L Herlache, P Wolfe, S Daugherty, J EB Reusch, T A Bauer, J G Regensteiner. “Type 2 diabetes exaggerates exercise effort and impairs exercise performance in older women.” BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, 2015; 3 (1): e000124