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Use of Immediate A1c Results in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

Jan 19, 2010
 

IFB of HbA1c is a more acceptable method of HbA1c determination in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus….

Immediate feedback (IFB) of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) results to adults with Type 1 and 2 diabetes allows more appropriate care decisions at the clinic visit and may improve glycemic control. The objective of this study is to determine whether IFB of HbA1c results to children with Type 1 diabetes will improve patient care and glycemic control.

 

In this prospective randomized controlled trial, children under 18 years of age were randomly assigned to receive HbA1c results during their diabetes clinic visit by point-of-care fingerstick testing (immediate) or several days after by venipuncture and laboratory assessment (conventional). HbA1c levels, therapy changes, and painfulness of testing were recorded at baseline and every follow-up appointment for a year.

Results: The 215 patients studied had similar baseline characteristics including initial HbA1c. IFB improved HbA1c at 3 months with a return to baseline for the remainder of the study. Subjects receiving conventional feedback had increased HbA1c results at 12 months. Less frequent patient–clinician communication between visits was reported with IFB. Subjects rated finger-sticks as less painful than conventional venipuncture.

From the results it was concluded that IFB of HbA1c is a more acceptable method of HbA1c determination in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Although sustained improvements in glycemic control did not result from this intervention alone, IFB testing resulted in more efficient patient–clinician communication and was less painful.

Pediatric Diabetes Submitted 5 August 2009. Accepted for publication 11 December 2009