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Skipping Breakfast May Increase Risk of Type 2 Diabetes for Women

Glucose total AUC was greater in the no-breakfast group compared with the breakfast group….

During a press conference at ENDO 2013, Dr. Elizabeth A. Thomas from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said skipping breakfast could have adverse cardiometabolic effects in obese women, including an increased risk for type 2 diabetes.

Thomas and colleagues conducted a randomized, crossover trial of 9 obese women aged 29.2 years (BMI 31.4 kg/m2) during 2 study days, roughly 1 month apart during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle. They were randomly assigned to either breakfast containing 25% of daily energy intake or no breakfast at all. Their lunch contained 35% of their daily energy intake, Thomas said.

According to data, pre-lunch insulin levels did not differ between groups. However, glucose total AUC was greater in the no-breakfast group compared with the breakfast group (20,775 mg/dL vs. 18,126 mg/dL×180 minutes; P=.004).

Further, pre-lunch free fatty acids appeared higher among patients in the no-breakfast group compared with the breakfast group (705 mEq/L vs. 25,692 mEq/L×180 minutes; P=.0002).

Additional study data indicate the incremental AUC for free fatty acids was also greater among patients in the no-breakfast group compared with the breakfast group (–92980 vs. –26008 mEq/L ×180 minutes; P<.001). This suggests pre-lunch free fatty acids did not promote the increased AUC, according to Thomas.

Pre-lunch triglycerides were also lower in the no-breakfast group. However, the AUC did not vary between groups, suggesting that a pre-lunch triglyceride level drove the response, Thomas said.

"In obese women, skipping breakfast results in acute relative insulin resistance and elevated levels of free fatty acids," Thomas said. "It’s possible that insulin resistance over time may predispose patients to further metabolic derangements and possibly progression to type 2 diabetes."

Practice 

  • Although the study was informative, other details need to be examined such as their other eating habits, which may be playing a role.

Presented at: The Endocrine Society Annual Meeting and Expo; June 15-18, 2013; San Francisco