Friday , October 20 2017

Sex & Diabetes

Paul De Los Santos, Doctor of Pharmacy Candidate, University Florida College of Pharmacy has read the new Sex and Diabetes Book by Janis Roszler and Donna Rice and has a great review for you to read.

Sex & Diabetes
by Janis Roszler and Donna Rice

Book Review by Paul  De Los Santos, Doctor of Pharmacy Candidate University of Florida College of Pharmacy

This is a self-empowering book that helps people understand different physiological, psychological, and social processes that all interact to cause disruption in the intimate setting. Many people are uncomfortable when the word “sex” is mentioned and I am no different. When the word “diabetes” is mentioned, people may feel uncomfortable for a variety of different reasons. Maybe they are a poorly controlled diabetic? Maybe they feel they have the disease and do not want to know? Or maybe this disease has altered their life somehow? The list is never ending. When this is the title of a book, “Sex and Diabetes,” something about it tells us when these words are combined; there is something more to this book than the words alone. This book is not only for couples. As a health care professional, this book helped me understand what these people are living through, which will in turn help me better care for them.

Within the first few pages that I read, the uneasy feelings of the topic quickly dissipated. The flow of the chapters makes it an easy read that encompasses the “normal” thought processes of people who are affected by sexual dysfunction and diabetes. For example, there are chapters that are named “For Him,” “For Her,” and “For Couples.” These chapters help a couple understand each other. In particular, the authors make excellent comparisons of well known couples, “Cliff and Clair Huxtable,” “Archie and Edith Bunker,” and “Lois Lane and Superman” These comparisons help the reader understand what role they are playing how they can make things better.

On the first of every chapter page, it lists the topics that will be covered, which helps focus the reader. There are helpful outlined selections throughout the book that tie into the topics of the pages around it. I thought some of the selections, which were personal stories, really hit home that people have faced many different challenges and experiences with sexual dysfunction and diabetes. This book helps people realize “it is not just you.” This book may even redefine what your endpoint goal may be, because sex and diabetes engages just as much emotion as well as physicality. The book gives great information on medications and aphrodisiacs that are easy to understand and not filled with medical jargon. Also, there are couples’ tools and exercises that will help bring you and your spouse closer.

Last but not least, at the end of the book there are “Recipes for Love” that incorporate selected aphrodisiacs aforementioned in the book. The recipes look easy and simple and I look forward to trying them all.

Overall, I thought this book was excellent. This book helps everyone recognize how intricate sex and diabetes is. By proactively embracing these experiences with love and understanding, the readers of this book will definitely benefit and place them closer to achieving their goal.

You can order you copy of this book by visiting this link