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Ronald Swerdloff Part 1, Male Hypogonadism And Diabetes

Feb 9, 2018
 

In part 1 of this Exclusive Interview, Dr. Ronald Swerdloff explains male hypogonadism and diabetes in a conversation with Diabetes in Control Publisher Steve Freed during the ADA 2017 Scientific Sessions in San Diego, CA.

Ronald Swerdloff, MD is a professor of medicine at David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the chief of division of endocrinology and metabolism at the Harbor UCLA Medical Center, and the senior investigator at the LA Biomedical Research Institute.

Transcript of this video segment:

Steve: This is Steve Freed with Diabetes in Control and we are here in San Diego with American Diabetes Association 77 scientific sessions. We have some great interviews with some of the top endocrinologists all across the globe.  Today we have with us a special guest, Dr. Ronald Swerdloff.  Why don’t we start off by you telling us a little about yourself?

Dr. Swerdloff: My name is Ronald Swerdloff and I am a professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the chief of division of endocrinology and metabolism at the Harbor UCLA Medical Center, and the senior investigator at the LA Biomedical Research Institute.

Steve: That’s great! I know you are here presenting, making you can tell us the title of your presentation!

Dr. Swerdloff: I am going to talk today about relationship between male hypogonadism, which is low testosterone, and diabetes mellitus.

Steve: Can you tell us about male hypogonadism?

Dr. Swerdloff:  Male hypogonadism occurs in men when they have a decreased production and secretion of testosterone from the testes.  Sometimes, it is referred to as the low Tsyndrome.  With that they have certain symptoms as well as having low testosterone levels.

Steve: Does that have a lot to do with sexual dysfunction?

Dr. Swerdloff:  Yes, individuals who have low testosterone levels may have decreased libido – decreased sexual function. They also have increase in osteoporosis, decrease in mood in many instances, and they have decrease in muscle mass and increase in obesity. So all these manifestations are important clinically.

Steve: Can adding testosterone replacement increase the risk of cancer, because I know personally that testosterone is the fuel for prostate cancer.

Dr. Swerdloff:  This is an interesting issue that goes back to Dr. Huggins winning the Nobel Prize for showing that testosterone with metastatic prostate cancer resulted in worse symptoms, however, most of the evidence at the present time has failed to show the direct relationship between the testosterone levels and the development of prostate cancer.  Furthermore, it has failed to show that testosterone will make subclinical prostate cancer worse.  Nevertheless, there are warnings that say that in people with prostate cancer you should you either not treat, or be careful in management of those patients if you treat them with testosterone.

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