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Test Your Knowledge

Take a quiz and test your knowledge on diabetes and related health concerns.

Question #834

Test Your Knowledge

Mrs. Wilson is an overweight 71-year old African American patient who has come to your clinic today for a new patient visit. She recently moved to the area to live with her daughter and is concerned about her diabetes care plan. She was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 12 years ago at a wellness check through routine screening. In hindsight, she wonders if maybe she “went undiagnosed for a while” because she “didn’t get to the clinic very often and was having some problems with frequent urination at night” before she was screened. She currently takes metformin, glyburide, captopril, pravastatin, aspirin and has recently titrated to.6 U/kg/day insulin NPH as a nightly basal dose. Her current A1C goal is below 7.5% and she has been working hard to get to that level. However, for the first time her life, she is finding herself to be nauseated and irritable in the morning, but always feels better after a little breakfast. She states she feels “pretty good for her age” although she occasionally has “a little chest tightness when walking more than 4 or 5 blocks.” Last time she remembered to check it a few days ago, her postprandial glucose was a little high at 214 mg/dL. After discussing her situation with her, you decide to modify Mrs. Wilson’s antihyperglycemic regimen. Which of the following treatment options would you choose? [A] metformin + long-acting analogue + rapid-acting analogue [B] metformin + glyburide + long-acting insulin analogue + rapid-acting analogue [C] metformin + glyburide + NPH + rapid-acting analogue [D] metformin + NPH + rapid-acting analogue Follow the link to see if you're correct!

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Question #833

Test Your Knowledge

Mrs. Wilson is an overweight 71-year-old African-American patient who has come to your clinic today for a new patient visit. She recently moved to the area to live with her daughter and is concerned about her diabetes care plan. She was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 12 years ago at a wellness check through routine screening. In hindsight, she wonders if maybe she “went undiagnosed for a while” because she “didn’t get to the clinic very often and was having some problems with frequent urination at night” before she was screened. She currently takes metformin, glyburide, captopril, pravastatin, aspirin and has recently titrated to .6 U/kg/day insulin NPH as a nightly basal dose. Her current A1C goal is below 7.5% and she has been working hard to get to that level. However, for the first time in her life, she is finding herself to be nauseated and irritable in the morning, but always feels better after a little breakfast. She states she feels “pretty good for her age” although she occasionally has “a little chest tightness when walking more than 4 or 5 blocks.” Last time she remembered to check it a few days ago, her postprandial glucose was a little high at 214 mg/dL. Her office A1C is 8.6%. Based on her history, what would be an acceptable individualized A1C goal for this patient? A. A1C less than 6.5% B. A1C less than 7.0% C. A1C less than 8.0% D. A1C greater than 8.0% Are you right? Follow the link to find out!

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Question #832

Test Your Knowledge

Mrs. Wilson is an overweight 71-year old African American patient who has come to your clinic today for a new patient visit. She recently moved to the area to live with her daughter and is concerned about her diabetes care plan. She was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 12 years ago at a wellness check through routine screening. In hindsight, she wonders if maybe she “went undiagnosed for a while” because she “didn’t get to the clinic very often and was having some problems with frequent urination at night” before she was screened. She currently takes metformin, glyburide, captopril, pravastatin, aspirin and has recently titrated to.6 U/kg/day insulin NPH as a nightly basal dose. Her current A1C goal is <7.5% and she has been working hard to get to that level. However, for the first time her life, she is finding herself to be nauseated and irritable in the morning, but always feels better after a little breakfast. She states she feels “pretty good for her age” although she occasionally has “a little chest tightness when walking more than 4 or 5 blocks.” Last time she remembered to check it a few days ago, her postprandial glucose was a little high at 214 mg/dL. Her office A1C is 8.6%. Based on what you know about the patient, what is the most likely cause of her morning distress? Select one answer: [A] Hyperglycemia [B] Hypoglycemia [C] Anxiety [D] Cognitive Have you got it right? Follow the link to find out!

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Question 831

Test Your Knowledge

Mr. Huang achieves good glycemic control with his lifestyle modifications, metformin and linagliptin and returns every 6 months for follow-up visits. Three years after initiating this treatment plan, he returns to your clinic for his 6-month check-up. When asked how his diabetes management is going at home, he shares that recently he has been “unable to really get out and get as much exercise as he knows he should due to his creaky, old knees acting up.” His current office A1C is 8.8%. You discuss with him what the next management steps may be to achieve his individualized glycemic goal. A long-acting insulin analogue was added to his treatment. What is the best advice you can give Mr. Huang regarding exercise? A. He really needs to find a way to perform 150 min/week of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. B. At his age, exercise doesn’t make a significant difference any more. C. He should do his best to be active and get as close to 150 min/week as he can. D. He should be as physically active as possible and introduce resistance training at least 2 times per week to his routine. Do you have the right answer? Follow the link to find out!

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April 23, 2016

Test Your Knowledge

Mr. Huang achieves good glycemic control with his lifestyle modifications, metformin and linaglipitin, and returns every 6 months for follow-up visits. Three years after initiating this treatment plan, he returns to your clinic for his 6-month check-up. When asked how his diabetes management is going at home, he shares that recently he has been “unable to really get out and get as much exercise as he know he should due to his creaky, old knees acting up.” His current office A1C is 8.8%. You discuss with him what the next management steps may be to achieve his individualized glycemic goal. What would your next medical management step be? Select one answer: A. Add a rapid-acting insulin analogue B. Add a long-acting insulin analogue C. Add a GLP-1 agonist D. Add a sulfonylurea Are you right? Follow the link to find out!

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Question 829

Test Your Knowledge

Mr. Carlson is a 52-year-old Caucasian grocery store manager you saw last week for a new patient visit. His labs from that visit were significant for elevated random plasma glucose 166 mg/dL, A1C 7.4% and elevated lipids (TG=175 mg/dL, LDL 148 mg/dL, HDL 38 mg/dL, total cholesterol 221 mg/dL). He has returned to your clinic for a follow-up appointment. His physical exam is notable for central abdominal obesity (waist circumference 42”), left eyelid xanthelasma, BP 147/91, HR 72, RR 18, BMI 36 kg/m2, but otherwise normal. A repeat A1C test shows A1C 7.6%. Mr. Carlson smokes between 1 and 1.5 packs of cigarettes daily. After discussing the labs and your findings with Mr. Carlson, you begin collaborating on a management plan. You write prescriptions for metformin, a statin and ACE inhibitor. Mr. Carlson doesn’t think “taking medication will be too tough,” but expresses skepticism about your recommendations for a change in his diet, exercise and smoking programs because he has tried them, without success, in the past. You are concerned about Mr. Carlson’s cigarette use because cigarette smoking has been shown to have multiple physiological impacts on health. Which one of the following statements regarding smoking and type 2 diabetes is true? A. It equally affects all-cause mortality in individuals with and without diabetes. B. In individuals with diabetes, it causes more rapid progression to micro- and macroalbuminuria. C. It has not been linked to worsening glycemic control. D. The use of bupropion is contraindicated in diabetes. Think you've got the right answer? Follow the link to check!

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Question #828

Test Your Knowledge

Mr. Carlson is a 52-year-old Caucasian grocery store manager you saw last week for a new patient visit. His labs from that visit were significant for elevated random plasma glucose 166 mg/dL, A1C 7.4% and elevated lipids (TG=175 mg/dL, LDL 148 mg/dL, HDL 38 mg/dL, total cholesterol 221 mg/dL). He has returned to your clinic for a follow-up appointment. His physical exam is notable for central abdominal obesity (waist circumference 42”), left eyelid xanthelasma, BP 147/91, HR 72, RR 18, BMI 36 kg/m2, but otherwise normal. A repeat A1C test shows A1C 7.6%. Mr. Carlson smokes between 1 and 1.5 packs of cigarettes daily. After discussing the labs and your findings with Mr. Carlson, you begin collaborating on a management plan. You write prescriptions for metformin, a statin and ACE inhibitor. Mr. Carlson doesn’t think “taking medication will be too tough,” but expresses skepticism about your recommendations for a change in his diet, exercise and smoking programs because he has tried them, without success, in the past. You are concerned about Mr. Carlson’s cigarette use because cigarette smoking has been shown to have multiple physiological impacts on health. Which one of the following statements regarding smoking and type 2 diabetes is true? A. It equally affects all-cause mortality in individuals with and without diabetes. B. In individuals with diabetes, it causes more rapid progression to micro- and macroalbuminuria. C. It has not been linked to worsening glycemic control. D. The use of bupropion is contraindicated in diabetes. Follow the link to see the correct answer!

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Question 827

Test Your Knowledge

Mr. Carlson is a 52-year-old Caucasian grocery store manager you saw last week for a new patient visit. His labs from that visit were significant for elevated random plasma glucose 166 mg/dL, A1C 7.4% and elevated lipids (TG=175 mg/dL, LDL 148 mg/dL, HDL 38 mg/dL, total cholesterol 221 mg/dL). He has returned to your clinic for a follow-up appointment. His physical exam is notable for central abdominal obesity (waist circumference 42”), left eyelid xanthelasma, BP 147/91, HR 72, RR 18, BMI 36 kg/m2, but otherwise normal. A repeat A1C test shows A1C 7.6%. Mr. Carlson smokes between 1 and 1.5 packs of cigarettes daily. After discussing the labs and your findings with Mr. Carlson, you begin collaborating on a management plan. You write prescriptions for metformin, a statin and ACE inhibitor. Mr. Carlson doesn’t think “taking medication will be too tough,” but expresses skepticism about your recommendations for a change in his diet, exercise and smoking programs because he has tried them, without success, in the past. Mr. Carlson makes an appointment with a registered dietitian. She discusses with him the benefits of medical nutrition therapy for weight, glycemic control, blood pressure, lipid profile and overall wellbeing. Which following statement regarding macronutrients is true? Select one answer: A. The ratio of carbohydrates, protein and fat is the same for all patients. B. Total calories consumed per day is the key strategy for achieving glycemic control. C. Reduced intake of trans fat lowers the HDL and raises the LDL. D. There is no single ideal dietary distribution of calories among carbohydrates, fats, and proteins for people with diabetes. Follow the link to test your knowledge!

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Question 826

Test Your Knowledge

Mr. Carlson is a 52-year-old Caucasian grocery store manager you saw last week for a new patient visit. His labs from that visit were significant for elevated random plasma glucose 166 mg/dL, A1C 7.4% and elevated lipids (TG=175 mg/dL, LDL 148 mg/dL, HDL 38 mg/dL, total cholesterol 221 mg/dL). He has returned to your clinic for a follow-up appointment. His physical exam is notable for central abdominal obesity (waist circumference 42”), left eyelid xanthelasma, BP 147/91, HR 72, RR 18, BMI 36 kg/m2, but otherwise normal. A repeat A1C test shows A1C 7.6%. Mr. Carlson smokes between 1 and 1.5 packs of cigarettes daily. After discussing the labs and your findings with Mr. Carlson, you begin collaborating on a management plan. You write prescriptions for metformin, a statin and ACE inhibitor. Mr. Carlson doesn’t think “taking medication will be too tough,” but expresses skepticism about your recommendations for a change in his diet, exercise and smoking programs because he has tried them, without success, in the past. What is considered the starting BMI for consideration of bariatric surgery? Select one answer: A. BMI greater than 28 kg/m2 B. BMI greater than 30 kg/m2 C. BMI greater than 35 kg/m2 D. BMI greater than 37 kg/m2 Are you right? Follow the link to find out!

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