Monday , December 11 2017
Home / Resources / Disasters Averted

Disasters Averted

Disasters Averted are stories submitted by our readers and medical editors from direct experience in the field. Do you have a story? If your story is used, we will send you a $25 Amazon Gift Card! Submissions can be anonymous.

Submit Your Story!

How Do You Discuss Vitamins?

So many of my patients who have insulin resistance, type 1 or type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia and/or obesity have vitamin D or vitamin B12 deficiency. Often they have never had their levels checked or, if they have, were diagnosed with either or both vitamin D deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency and do not take their prescribed vitamins. Why?

Read More »

Do You “Make Room” for Your Patients?

Female, 67 years of age, type 2 diabetes, class 2 diabetes, depression, hyperlipidemia, vitamin D deficiency plus more. Her A1C is 6.8% and her lipids are within goal. Her random glucose 2 hours after eating cookies was 118 today. Her glucose lowering meds are Trulicity, metformin, and Jardiance. She takes them as prescribed. Her endocrinologist recommended she meet with me. She refused until he recommended she see me the same day she was coming in to see another health care provider for her monthly infusion for another disease process to make getting here easier.

Read More »

Scare Them or Inspire Them?

Today, my patient, a woman, 42 years of age, brought her daughter who is 18 years of age with her for her visit. Mother has PCOS, class III obesity and type 2 diabetes. She told me she brought her because of the strong family history of diabetes on both sides of his family. She wanted her to understand what someone who has diabetes goes through.

Read More »

Teaching Children to Manage Diabetes Has Its Limits

Female, 25 years of age related a story to me she recalls from years back. Patient was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at 5 years of age. Mother has had type 1 diabetes since childhood, so patient had learned a lot about living with type 1 diabetes since a young child. Patient is and has been a very independent person. Both her mother and father trusted her and for the most part worked with her pediatrician to manage her diabetes.

Read More »

How to Be More Culturally Sensitive

Having worked with patients, children, adolescents, and adults who have diabetes for oh so many years, I’ve learned it’s better to change what I teach than to expect my patients to change their entire lifestyle. One of the toughest things for patients to do is to change the way they eat, especially if deep rooted in their ethnic background. One example is asking patients who are from the Middle East or those who are brought up on rice and beans to avoid or cut back on rice.

Read More »

Knowing Numbers Keeps Patients on Track

Received a phone call from someone I know. Has not yet come in for a visit. Just called to see if she qualified to come in for a visit. Woman, 68 years of age, denies history of diabetes, hypertension or other health problems, except being overweight. She stated, “Last year my weight was up. I went on a diet because my triglycerides were high, in the 600’s, but they came down to 140’s when I lost 30 pounds last year. I think I gained back about 10 pounds so that would be about 155 pounds now.” I asked her if she’s weighed herself. She said, no, not since I got off the program, but when I was on the program, I weighed daily. You know, I had holidays, travel, I was with a group, paid for the food, so ate what they all ate, then I just couldn’t get back on track.”

Read More »

Insulin for Life Answering Calls for Help

Concerned about the extreme weather disasters we have had and those predicted, I reached out to Carol Atkinson, Director of Insulin for Life, a trusted organization, to see how we could help. She was so busy putting packages together for people who have diabetes, she quickly told me the story of Wharton, Texas. It was Labor Day weekend. Hurricane Harvey had just hit and it hit Wharton, Texas hard. They were in need of insulin.

Read More »

The Power of Numbers

A disaster can be considered many different things to different people. For some it could mean developing type 2 diabetes rather than preventing or delaying it. If you watch our expert video series you will hear our Publisher ask many of our experts, “Whether or not you have diabetes, what would you like your A1C to be?” As our expert, Dr. Karl Nadolsky said, he’d like his to be in the normal range, ~ 5%. This is not unusual for us as health care providers to want and work towards a normal A1C, that is, depending on age, and risk for complications of hypoglycemia.

Read More »