Wednesday , November 22 2017
Home / Conditions / Type 2 Diabetes / Resistance Exercise after Dinner Decreases CVD Risk for Type 2’s

Resistance Exercise after Dinner Decreases CVD Risk for Type 2’s

Glucose and fat levels in the blood decreased among obese adults with type 2 diabetes when they exercised after a meal…

Jill Kanaley, PhD, of the department of nutrition and exercise physiology at the University of Missouri, said in a press release, “This study shows that it is not just the intensity or duration of exercising that is important, but also the timing of when it occurs.” Results from this study show that resistance exercise has its most powerful effect on reducing glucose and fat levels in one’s blood when performed after dinner.

The researchers evaluated 13 adults with obesity and type 2 diabetes to determine whether pre- or post-dinner resistance exercise is more effective for reducing risk for CVD. Participants completed three trials in which they consumed a meal and either performed no resistance exercise, performed resistance exercise before the meal or performed resistance exercise 45 minutes after the meal. Primary clinical outcomes were postprandial glucose and triacylglycerol concentrations.

Compared with no resistance exercise and resistance exercise before a meal, resistance exercise after a meal resulted in a 92% reduction in postprandial incremental-triacylglycerol area under the curve (P ≤ .02). Pre-dinner glucose was significantly lower when resistance exercise was performed before a meal compared with none or after a meal (P < .01). Compared with no resistance exercise, postprandial glucose decreased by 30% with resistance exercise after a meal and 18% with resistance exercise before a meal.

“Knowing that the best time to exercise is after a meal could provide health care professionals with a better understanding of how to personalize exercise prescriptions to optimize health benefits,” Kanaley said.

Research on how exercising in the morning differs from after dinner is planned for future studies, according to Kanaley. “If clinicians have a patient that may not be responding to exercise with lower glucose levels and are currently exercising, they may want to try moving the time of exercise until after dinner to see if this helps their postprandial glucose levels and their impaired fasting glucose levels the next morning.”

Practice Pearls:

  • This study shows that it is not just the intensity or duration of exercising that is important, but also the timing of when it occurs.”
  • Resistance exercise after a meal resulted in a 92% reduction in postprandial incremental-triacylglycerol area under the curve.
  • Compared with no resistance exercise, postprandial glucose decreased by 30% with resistance exercise after a meal and 18% with resistance exercise before a meal.

Timothy Heden. Post-dinner resistance exercise improves postprandial risk factors more effectively than pre-dinner resistance exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes, Journal of Applied Physiology, 24 December 2014, DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00917.2014