Friday , October 20 2017
Home / Resources / Articles / People with Diabetes More Likely to Have an Eating Disorder

People with Diabetes More Likely to Have an Eating Disorder

Survey shows depression also slightly higher…. 

A recent study which included over 52,000 participants and took place in over 19 countries found that patients with diabetes are more likely than the general population to have an eating disorder or be diagnosed with depression. To collect the information, researchers met with patients in their homes and asked them to complete a series of surveys. The reported results found that 2,580 of the participants had adult onset diabetes, defined as being older than 21 years of age at the time of diagnosis.

The survey showed that 11% of patients surveyed with adult-onset diabetes reported being depressed, which was slightly higher than the general population. The results also showed that people with adult-onset diabetes were four times more likely than the general population to report having an eating disorder, either in the past or present. The eating disorders which were asked about included bulimia and binge eating disorder.

The results suggest that people with impulse control disorders including binge eating or bulimia earlier in life may later become diabetic. One of the researchers tried to explain the results by saying that there may be a connection between an inappropriate processing of glucose in the body and poor impulse control or depression. This study may be beneficial when assessing patients since the risk factors of depression and eating disorders generally develop much earlier in life than diabetes.

Practice Pearls:
  • A survey given to 2,580 adult-onset diabetes patients discovered that diabetics are four times more likely than the general population to have had an eating disorder in the past or present.
  • 11% of patients with adult-onset diabetes also reported being depressed, with this number being slightly higher than the general population.
  • One of the researchers explained these results by saying that there may be a connection between an inappropriate processing of glucose in the body and poor impulse control or depression.
Diabetologia, Jan, 2014