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One in 10 American Adults is Diabetic; 1 in 4 is Unaware

The United States has 3 million more diabetic patients today than in 2010…. 

According to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report, recently released by the Centers for Disease Control, at least 29 million people living in the U.S. have diabetes; 28% of these patients are undiagnosed. In a study done from 2009 to 2012, 37% of adults in the U.S. were considered pre-diabetic based on fasting glucose and A1C levels. This equates to 86 million Americans who will become diabetic if something doesn’t change.

Diabetes and related complications, including medical costs and lost work totals 245 billion dollars which is an increase from 174 billion in 2010.

Dr. Ann Albright, director of the CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, said in a statement, "Diabetes is costly in both human and economic terms. If we do nothing, and the numbers continue to rise, 1 in 5 people will have diabetes by the year 2025, and possibly 1 in 3 by 2050."

Therefore the American College of Cardiology (ACC) in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association, the American College of Physicians and Joslin Diabetes Center has announced a partnership and the launch of a new Diabetes Collaborative Registry that will help practitioners work together to track and improve the quality of care across the continuum.

The registry will track the growing number of diabetic patients in the ACC’s PINNACLE Registry, which is the largest ambulatory cardiovascular registry in the U. S. ACC president Dr. Patrick T. O’Gara, believes there is a clear need-for cross specialty management of diabetes patients especially because cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for diabetic patients. In O’Gara’s words, "By consolidating patient data, this registry will allow primary care physicians and specialists who treat patients with diabetes to compare data and access real-time metrics on patients in all stages of the disease."

With support and funding from sponsor AstraZeneca, the Diabetes Collaborative Registry will allow participating primary care physicians, endocrinologists, cardiologists and other specialists involved in the direct care of the patient to access electronic medical records.

President and CEO of the Joslin Diabetes Center, John L. Brooks III, says the "center is pleased to be a founding partner of the first clinical diabetes registry. Not only will patients benefit with a registry of this kind; so will diabetic researchers who will gain access to numerous data from a variety of specialists. This will ensure that research is based on the most current data that is out there."

"Diabetes is not one disease but a complex set of diseases and too often leads to serious and potentially life-threatening complications, such as cardiovascular and kidney disease, as well as nerve damage, amputation, blindness and a multitude of other health problems," said American Diabetes Association Chief Scientific and Medical Officer Robert E. Ratner, MD, FACP, FACE. "We hope that a cross-specialty, clinical registry will ultimately allow us to improve the quality of care — and therefore quality of life — for all people living with diabetes by giving researchers a clearer picture of what’s happening to patients at various stages of their disease. Improved data collection should help us improve patient outcomes."

Practice Pearls:
  • According to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report, 29 million people living in the U.S. have diabetes; 28% of these patients are undiagnosed.
  • 1 in 5 people will have diabetes by the year 2025, and possibly 1 in 3 by 2050.
  • A new Diabetes Collaborative Registry will be formed

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014. Report