Wednesday , November 22 2017
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New Wearable Device Detects Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

Developed by Taiwanese researchers, the device can hang on a pair of glasses and is called a "pupillometer." … 

Mang Ou-Yang, the research leader at National Chiao-Tung University, says the pupillometer offers a more reliable, effective, portable, and inexpensive solution compared to the other existing techniques when it comes to diagnosing diabetic autonomic neuropathy in its early stages.

While at the doctor"s office, the pupillometer is worn for approximately 30 minutes, and it will monitor the patient"s pupils. According to the release, the device emits four colored lights in order to stimulate the pupils, and the light reflected from the eye is logged and used to evaluate the pupil. It can measure up to 10 different parameters that are associated with pupil response time, pupil response speed, and pupil diameter. Five of these parameters were able to help detect the presence of diabetic autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes.

The researchers are still modifying the pupillometer, and hope to make it smaller. They also are working on finding a way for the device to collect more data and measure two pupils simultaneously. If clinical trials are successful, Ou-Yang predicts that the device could be available by 2020.

Practice Pearls:
  • Researchers have developed a device that can hang from a pair of glasses and detect diabetic autonomic neuropathy.
  • It is worn for around 30 minutes at the doctor"s office while it detects 10 different parameters linked to pupil response time, pupil response speed, and pupil diameter, and 5 of these parameters can help to detect diabetic autonomic neuropathy in its early stages in patients with diabetes.
  • Researcher Ou-Yang believes it will be available for use by 2020.

Press release from the Optical Society