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Long-term Effects of Rosiglitazone on Lipids and Body Weight

HDL-C and body weight increased and remained elevated for the duration of the study. Although rosiglitazone, an insulin sensitizer, is known to have beneficial effects on high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size, it has unwanted effects on total cholesterol (TC) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations and body weight in some short-term studies.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of rosiglitazone on serum lipid levels and body weight. This was an Open labeled clinical study. They prospectively evaluated fasting serum glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), lipid profiles and body weight at baseline and every 3 months after the use of rosiglitazone (4 mg/day) for 18 months in 202 type 2 diabetic patients.

The results showed that TC levels increased maximally at 3 months and decreased thereafter. However, overall, TC levels remained significantly higher at 18 months than those at baseline. LDL-C levels from the 3-month to the 12-month timepoint were significantly higher than those at baseline. However, after 15 months, LDL-C concentrations were not significantly different from basal LDL-C concentrations. HDL-C levels increased after the first 3 months and these levels were maintained. The increment of change in HDL-C was more prominent in patients with low basal HDL-C concentrations than in patients with high basal HDL-C concentrations. Body weight increased after the first 3 months and these levels were maintained.

From the results it was concluded that, HDL-C and body weight increased and remained elevated for the duration of the study. There was an initial increase in LDL-C but this attenuated and by the end of the study was not significantly elevated above baseline levels.

The study demonstrated the effect of rosiglitazone on the lipid profile, glycemic control and body weight for 18 months in 202 patients. TC levels peaked at 3 months and decreased thereafter, but remained significantly higher than the levels measured at baseline. LDL-C levels from the 3-month to the 12-month timepoints were higher than at baseline, but LDL-C levels from the 15-month to the 18-month timepoints were not different from baseline. HDL-C levels from the 3-month to the 18-month timepoints were higher than that at baseline. The increase in HDL-C concentrations was more prominent in the group with low basal HDL-C levels than in the group with high basal HDL-C levels. Body weight increased during the study period, but stabilized after 3 months. In conclusion, HDL-C and body weight increased and remained elevated for the duration of the study. There was an initial increase in LDL-C but this attenuated and by the end of the study was not significantly elevated above baseline levels. Overall, the TC/HDL ratio initially increased but then decreased below baseline levels with longer-term treatment with rosiglitazone.

Clin Endocrinol. 2006;65(4):453-459

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Kids Who Snack in Large Groups Tend to Eat More: Children snacking in big groups eat almost a third more than when snacking with a couple of mates. The researchers analyzed the eating behavior of 54 children between the ages of 2 and 6 when they were in a group of nine children and when they were in a group of three. Each child was given a standard snack, and the amount consumed on each occasion was weighed. Children ate slightly more in the larger groups when the snacking time was less than 11 minutes. But when snacking went on for longer, children in the larger groups ate 30% more than children eating in small groups, irrespective of the time they took over their snacks. The fact that children ate more in larger groups is at least partly explained by their starting to eat sooner and more quickly in these circumstances. The pattern of eating more in larger groups than when eating alone, is common among adults and animals, say the researchers. Termed “social facilitation,” the phenomenon stems from the stimuli provided by the sight and sound of others engaged in the same behavior. It overrides the brain’s normal signals of satiety. The researchers suggest that children who eat too little might fare better eating with the family and/or friends at home. And children who already eat too much should keep away from fast food restaurants, where the busy and chaotic environment might stimulate them further to eat even more. Archives of Disease in Childhood2007 doi: 10.1136/adc.2006/103259] Click here to view the paper in full: http://press.psprings.co.uk/adc/february/ac103259.pdf