Wednesday , December 13 2017
Home / Resources / Articles / Long Term Complications in Young-Onset Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Long Term Complications in Young-Onset Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

Young-onset type 2 diabetes patients have a greater mortality and lethality when compared to type 1 diabetes in similar ages of onset….

The differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes are fairly well-known in terms of insulin resistance versus deficiency, age of onset, typical body build, and treatment. However, the long-term outcomes of young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to type 1 diabetes have not been studied extensively. Constantino et. al. performed a study evaluating the long-term complications and mortality in young-onset type 2 diabetes compared to type 1 diabetes with patients having similar age of onset. This study, accepted in May of 2013, took records from the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Diabetes Clinical Database in Australia and matched them with the Australian National Death Index to establish mortality outcomes in 354 patients with type 2 diabetes (age of onset 15-30 years old) compared to 470 patients with type 1 diabetes at a similar age of onset.

The observation period was around 21 years for the type 2 patients and 23 years for the type 1 patients. Out of the total 824 patients studied with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, 71 patients died. There was a significant difference in mortality and hazard for death between the two groups. Young-onset type 2 patients had higher mortality at 11% versus 6.8% of type 1 patients (p = 0.03) and an increased hazard for death (HR = 2.0, p = 0.003). Patients with young-onset type 2 diabetes experienced a significantly shorter duration of disease before dying (p = 0.01). Type 1 patients lived around 37 years after onset while type 2 patients only lived around 27 years after onset. Cardiovascular deaths occurred in 50% of the type 2 group and 30% of the type 1 group. Both groups had similar glycemic control but young-onset type 2 patients exhibited increased prevalence of albuminuria, cardiovascular risk factors, neuropathy, and macrovascular complications when compared to type 1 patients.

The study concluded that young-onset type 2 diabetes has greater mortality and lethality when compared to type 1 diabetes in similar ages of onset. Since the majority of studies focus on the more common late-onset type 2 diabetes, this study helps us gain insight into the young-onset type 2 diabetic patients that don’t fit into the stereotypical type 2 diabetes frame.

Constantino, Maria I. "Long-Term Complications and Mortality in Young-Onset Diabetes: Type 2 Diabetes Is More Hazardous and Lethal than Type 1 Diabetes." Diabetes Care. Diabetes Centre, 11 July 2013. Web. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Long-Term+Complications+and+Mortality+in+Young-Onset+Diabetes>.