Even when body mass index of greater than 35 kg/m2, healthcare professionals are infrequently prescribing metformin for the treatment of prediabetes.  It was reported in Diabetes Care online in the April 3 issue that metformin is used less than 0.7% of the time, even when the patient is overweight.  Metformin has not been FDA approved for the use in prediabetes, so it is considered an off-label use even though metformin has been shown to:

The researchers found that 7,652 of 22,174 adults had prediabetes. Among those with prediabetes, the age-adjusted prevalence of metformin use was 0.7 percent. Metformin use correlated with elevated body mass index (BMI) (35.1 versus 29.6 kg/m²) and with higher glucose (fasting glucose, 114 versus 105 mg/dL; two-hour post-stimulated glucose, 155 versus 128 mg/dL; and hemoglobin A1c, 6.0 versus 5.6 percent). Even among those with a BMI ≥35 kg/m², metformin use was low. There was no variation in metformin use by race, poverty-to-income ratio, or education. “Metformin use was <1 percent among U.S. adults with prediabetes and only slightly more common among those with additional risk factors for diabetes,” the authors write.  Further study on how to implement metformin as a preventive intervention for type 2 diabetes is needed to truly does the paper say truly or is this our writer’s opinion. If our writer’s opinion, we should take out the word truly stem the tide of the diabetes epidemic. Remembering that all drugs have side effects also stem the tide of the diabetes epidemic. Remembering that all drugs have side effects also stem the tide of the diabetes epidemic. Remembering that all drugs have side effects also

Metformin Use in Prediabetes Among U.S. Adults, 2005–2012; Eva Tseng, Hsin-Chieh Yeh and Nisa M. Maruthur:  Diabetes Care 2017 Apr; dc161509. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc16-1509