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This article originally posted and appeared in  Issue 656

Diabetes Risk Tied to Duration and Timing of Obesity

Whether your patients are young or old, being obese can boost their chances of developing diabetes.... 
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According to recent research, the risk of diabetes may be even higher in people who became obese earlier in life. Results showed that women who became obese before turning 16 had more than twice the odds of having diabetes than women who became obese after age 18.

The study was conducted by Penny Gordon-Larsen, PhD, of the University of North Carolina, and colleagues. The researchers wanted to see if people's risk of diabetes changed depending on when they became obese and how long they had been obese. They found that both men and women who became obese before turning 18 had a higher risk of diabetes than those who became obese as adults.

Women who became obese before age 16 were more likely than those who became obese after age 18 to develop diabetes, with an odds ratio of 2.77.

An odds ratio is the ratio of the odds of an event happening in one group versus that of another group. A ratio of more than 1.0 means that event has higher odds of happening in the first group than in the second. In this case, the event was developing diabetes.

Results also showed that people who became obese as teenagers and continued to be obese into adulthood were more likely to develop diabetes.

Compared to men who became obese as adults, those who became obese as teens had higher odds of diabetes, with an odds ratio of 2.27.

Compared to women who became obese as adults, those who became obese earlier in life had higher odds of diabetes, with an odds ratio of 2.08.

According to the authors, these findings highlight the need to address obesity in young people to prevent diabetes.

The study involved 10,481 participants. Among those between 24 and 33 years of age, 4.4 percent had diabetes. Diabetes rates were higher in blacks and Hispanics than in whites. 

Diabetes Care, Dec. 5, 2012  

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This article originally posted 13 December, 2012 and appeared in  Issue 656

Past five issues: Issue 756 | Diabetes Clinical Mastery Series Issue 215 | SGLT-2 Inhibitors Special Edition November 2014 | Issue 755 | GLP-1 Special Editions November 2014 |

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