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Global Diabetes Awareness in Primary Care

Is it enough?… 

A recent correlational descriptive study used a self-administered questionnaire to assess diabetes awareness and risk behaviors among patients in three primary healthcare centers located in the south of Jordan.

Both male and female adult patients with diabetes (N=541) with an average age of 33.5 years were recruited for the study; 36.8% of subjects reported having university or college degrees and family history of diabetes was reported by 53.8% of subjects. Having diabetes was reported by 18.1% of subjects.

Study participants reported the most important component of diabetes management to be diabetes medications such as insulin or oral agents. The study found an association between increased diabetes awareness and participation in diabetes risk reduction behaviors. Increased diabetes awareness was directly influenced by increased education level of the patient. Overall, researchers concluded that the participation in risk reduction behaviors was less than optimal. These findings were consistent with those in previous literature.These results also suggest that risk reduction behaviors among diabetes patients are suboptimal and public awareness of diabetes and risk reduction behaviors should be increased.

Limitations of the study include that the questionnaire was self-administered (allowing for bias), location was restricted to the south of Jordan, and adult patients were young in age (mean 33.5 yr).

Practice Pearls:
  • Study participants reported the most important component of diabetes management to be diabetes medications such as insulin or oral agents.
  • Increased diabetes awareness is associated with increased education levels.
  • Overall participation in diabetes risk reduction behaviors is suboptimal and public awareness should be increased. 

Al-Khawaldeh, O., Al-Jaradeen, N. Diabetes awareness and diabetes risk reduction behaviors among attendance of primary healthcare centers. Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews. 2013;7:172-178