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Gastric Bypass Surgery Increases Energy Expenditure During Food Intake

Researchers seek explanation for sustained weight loss after procedure…

The mechanism that causes long-term weight loss with gastric bypass surgery is currently unclear. Reduced caloric intake does not provide the entire explanation for why gastric bypass patients maintain long-term weight loss. Previous studies suggests that enhanced energy expenditure might play a significant role.

Researchers conducted a study that included six obese female participants without other co-morbidities to reveal the impact of gastric bypass surgery on each major component constituting total energy expenditure. The six participants were assessed before and at 10 days, 3 months, and 20 months after their gastric bypass surgery. Indirect calorimetry in a metabolic chamber was used to assess 24-hour energy expenditure at each visit.

The results showed that the median BMI decreased significantly from 41.4 kg/m2 before surgery to 28 kg/m2 when measured at the 20-month visit (p<0.05). Energy expenditure after a standard meal increased after surgery when adjusted for total tissue (p<0.05). This study reveals that gastric bypass surgery was associated with an increased energy expenditure after food intake when corrected for body composition.

Practice Pearls:

  • The mechanism that causes long-term weight loss with gastric bypass surgery is currently unclear. Reduced caloric intake does not provide the entire explanation for why gastric bypass patients maintain long-term weight loss.
  • Energy expenditure after a standard meal increased after surgery when adjusted for total tissue (p<0.05).
  • This study reveals that gastric bypass surgery was associated with an increased energy expenditure after food intake when corrected for body composition.

Werling M, Fändriks L, Olbers T, et al. “Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Increases Respiratory Quotient and Energy Expenditure during Food Intake.” PLoS ONE. 2015;10(6).