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Effects of Self-care and Social Support on Glycemic Control

Jun 13, 2013
 

Having better provider-patient communication, having social support, and having higher self-efficacy were associated with better glycemic control….

Several studies have addressed the impact that self-efficacy, social support and patient-provider communication can have on patient glycemic control. However, not many studies have demonstrated the pathways through which these constructs operate to improve glycemic control. Researchers used structural equation modeling to test a conceptual model to theorize how self-efficacy, social support and patient-provider communication can impact glycemic control through self-care in adult patients with type 2 diabetes.

The cross-sectional study was conducted with 222 adults with type 2 diabetes within a single primary care facility. The researchers gathered data on demographics, self-efficacy, social support, patient-provider communication and diabetes self-care through questionnaires and subject interviews. Researchers also took into account Hemoglobin A1c readings to measure patient compliance and self efficacy. A measured variable path analysis was used to identify the predicted pathways linking self-efficacy, social support and patient-provider communication to diabetes self-care and ultimately glycemic control.

As predicted by the researchers, diabetes self-care had a direct positive effect on glycemic control. Inversely, the researchers found that no direct effect was noted when measuring for self-efficacy, social support or patient-provider communication on glycemic control. Other results showed a significant positive correlation for diabetes self-care from high self-efficacy, social support and patient-provider communication. All study measurements had an indirect effect on HbA1c. Additionally, patient-provider communication was positively associated with social support (p < .001).

In conclusion, the authors said, "Having better provider-patient communication, having social support, and having higher self-efficacy was associated with performing diabetes self-care behaviors; and these behaviors were directly linked to glycemic control." Still, more longitudinal studies are needed to identify the absolute effect of self-efficacy, social support and patient-provider communication on changes in diabetes glycemic control and self-care behaviors.

Gao, J. , J. Wang, P. Zheng, and et al. "Effects of self-care, self-efficacy, social support on glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes." School of Public Health, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education28 May 2013. Web. 6 Jun 2013.