Friday , February 23 2018
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Physical Activity

Physical Activity and Exercise for Diabetics: Diabetes in Control answers key questions about the uses and challenges of physical for diabetes management, including:
– How physical activity affects diabetes patients
– How/when a healthcare professional should or should not use exercise as a treatment for diabetic patients
– What does a healthcare professional needs to know to enhance the safety of physical activity for diabetes patients

When a Bike Is Not a Bike…But Rather a Health Device

Why are people inactive, especially when they have diabetes and know how much physical activity could benefit them? If they’re older, overweight or obese, arthritic, or dealing with other physical or joint limitations, they may not feel capable of walking for exercise, and they may not have easy access to other types of activities. This may be particularly true of adults with nerve damage in their feet or arthritic knees for whom walking for exercise is just not feasible. Enter the Corratec Life Bike, particularly designed with adults with diabetes in mind.

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Head Scratching Days with Insulin Action Changes

The topic of insulin action (resistance and sensitivity) has come up multiple times over the years in my articles, but it is admittedly much more complex than I often make it out to be. In a DIC article last summer, you can find a short list of all the factors that can potentially improve insulin action (basically insulin sensitivity). In reality, though, sometimes it is impossible to know exactly what is causing your reduced insulin action from day to day and how to easily and consistently manage it.

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How to Improve What Really Matters: Quality of Life, Not Longevity

For many years, I have focused on aspects of lifestyle and health management that can enhance quality of life, especially when living with a chronic disease like diabetes, rather than simply on living a long time (longevity). Much of my motivation is derived from the personal experience of watching my maternal grandmother suffer through six (long) years of severe disability related to cardiovascular complications of diabetes starting at the age of 70 that left her unable to feed herself or communicate, bed bound, and with almost no quality of life for her final six years of life. Really, what is the point of simply being alive when you’re really not experiencing life under such conditions?

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