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Physical Activity

Physical Activity and Exercise for Diabetics: Diabetes in Control answers key questions about the uses and challenges of physical for diabetes management, including:
– How physical activity affects diabetes patients
– How/when a healthcare professional should or should not use exercise as a treatment for diabetic patients
– What does a healthcare professional needs to know to enhance the safety of physical activity for diabetes patients

Using Diabetes Technologies Like CGM During Exercise

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM
A topic that comes up frequently nowadays is the use of diabetes technologies with exercise. When I surveyed close to 300 active individuals with diabetes, more than 60 percent used an insulin pump (which is well above the national average), but even more of these exercisers—over 75 percent—wear a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device (1). The technology fervor has grown even louder since the FDA recently granted approval in the United States to an implantable, three-month CGM sensor called Eversense (made by Senseonics). Can active people benefit from using these CGM and other devices, especially when active?

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Going Low-Carb as an Athlete with Diabetes

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by Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM

There has been a lot of interest recently in going “low-carb” to better manage diabetes, particularly type 1. At present, a large clinical study is being undertaken in Scandinavia to examine the effects of very low-carb eating on blood glucose levels in adults with type 1 diabetes. For years, a very low-carb diet championed by Dr. Bernstein has been the main one followed by some with diabetes, until the last decade when fad weight loss plans like the LCHF (low-carb, high-fat, or Keto) and Paleo Diets have been become mainstream not just for losing weight, but also for their purported ability to boost to athletic performance and improve blood glucose management. All these eating plans are very low in carbohydrates, but differ in the types of non-carb macronutrients or foods they recommend.

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Why Being Physically Active Does a Body Good

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD, FACSM

How active are you? Unless you’re exercising more than several hours a day already, you probably have room to add more in for additional health benefits. Exercise is about the best medicine that there is for so many health conditions, including diabetes. Being active helps manage emotional stress and stave off depression—far better than antidepressant medications and with no bad side effects. It naturally bestows your body with antioxidant effect, making you less likely to develop most types of cancer—or even the common cold.

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Motivational Tips for Getting and Staying Fit

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD
You may have started the new year out with the best of intentions to increase your fitness and better manage your diabetes by exercising regularly. If you have diabetes or are at risk for developing the disease, deciding to commit to fitness could be a real lifesaver. That’s why it’s more important than ever that you make sure this decision sticks. Here are some motivational tips for getting started being more active.

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Get off the Couch and Work Your Core: 10 Exercises for Core Fitness

By Sheri R. Colberg, PhD

If you suffer from diabetes, you already know that staying fit greatly benefits your health. Yet, many of the complications caused by diabetes can make it difficult to get the exercise you need; in fact, they can make a normal exercise routine difficult or even dangerous. For example, peripheral neuropathy (numbness in the feet caused by nerve damage) may affect your balance and put you at risk for a fall, or could lead to slow-healing ulcers that keep you inactive. On top of that, diabetes patients may have heart disease symptoms or vision problems that make getting up and going for a walk more risky than helpful.

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Are You Getting Enough “SPA” Time?

By Sheri R. Colberg: Exploring the Benefits of Spontaneous Physical Activity

You’ve probably heard about the recent reports revealing just how dangerous it is to be sedentary. Simply sitting for too long at one time is now a recognized health hazard that everyone should be aware of. But if you suffer from diabetes or prediabetes, a sedentary lifestyle is particularly dangerous. Getting regular exercise and movement is one of the most important things you can do to keep your blood glucose under control, maintain a healthy body weight, and reduce your risk of developing complications related to diabetes.

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There’s a New Diabetes Website in Town

Decades ago, going to an International Diabetic Athletes Association (IDAA) meeting in 1990 helped shaped the future direction of my career in diabetes and exercise. I remember talking with people about managing blood glucose with type 1 diabetes during activities of varying types and intensities, and my interest in compiling such useful information led to my first book attempting to create a guide for exercisers with diabetes in 2001. IDAA later became the Diabetes Exercise & Sports Association (DESA), and it later combined with InsulinDependence.org. Sadly, all those organizations are now defunct, the latest casualties of money problems that many not-for-profit organizations have experienced of late.

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