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Devices

Medical Devices for Diabetes Management: The following articles answer key questions about the use and application of medical devices for diabetes patient care including:
– What do they do and how?
– What medical device options are available for diabetes management?
– When should a medical device be considered?

Dexcom G4 Platinum with SHARE Gets FDA Approval

  The FDA has approved Dexcom’s G4 PLATINUM Continuous Glucose Monitoring System with Share. The Dexcom Share receiver uses a secure wireless connection via Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) between a patient’s receiver and an app on the patient’s smartphone to transmit glucose information to apps on the mobile devices of …

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Tattoo-Based Sensor Detects Glucose Levels

An ultra-thin, flexible sensor that sticks to the skin like a temporary tattoo can detect a person’s blood glucose levels… “The sensor represents the first example of an easy-to-wear flexible tattoo-based epidermal diagnostic device combining reverse iontophoretic extraction of interstitial glucose and an enzyme-based amperometric biosensor,” the researchers wrote. In …

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Handbook of Diabetes, 4th Ed., Excerpt #25: Specific Circumstances that Affect Diabetes Control

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Rudy Bilous, MD, FRCP Richard Donnelly, MD, PHD, FRCP, FRACP Exercise Regular physical exercise is an important component of the management and prevention of type 2 diabetes (Figure 26.1). Aerobic exercise, in particular, and resistance exercise improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Blood glucose and lipid profiles improve, as well as insulin …

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Handbook of Diabetes, 4th Ed., Excerpt #24: Psychological and Psychiatric Problems in Diabetes

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Rudy Bilous, MD, FRCP Richard Donnelly, MD, PHD, FRCP, FRACP Particular groups of patients with diabetes are at risk of different psychological problems (Table 25.1). Many chil­dren show remarkable resilience to the diagnosis of diabetes, but about one-third have some temporary psychological distress, mostly ‘adjustment disorders’ such as difficulty in sleeping, depression, …

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Handbook of Diabetes, 4th Ed., Excerpt #23: Skin and Connective Disorders in Diabetes

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Rudy Bilous, MD, FRCP Richard Donnelly, MD, PHD, FRCP, FRACP Diabetes affects the cellular biochemistry of skin and connective tissues, in particular collagen synthesis and struc­ture, as well as cutaneous microvascular blood flow. Several non-infective skin conditions are associated with type 1 and/ or type 2 diabetes (Box 24.1). Diabetic dermopathy (‘shin …

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