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Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment and Research: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that destroys pancreatic beta cells. Once called juvenile diabetes, Type 1 is diagnosed most often in children, but can be expressed in adults as well. Incidence is highest among non-hispanic whites, according to the NDEP. Adults with Type 1 make up 5% of all diagnosed diabetes patients.New tools, techniques, treatments, drugs and devices can help you improve outcomes for your patients with Type 1.

International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #8: Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Part 2 of 5

Type 1A diabetes results from a chronic autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells, probably initiated by exposure of a genetically susceptible individual to some environmental agent(s). This preclinical period is marked by the presence of autoantibodies to pancreatic beta-cell antigens such as insulin, GAD65 (Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase), ICA512 (called also IA-2) or ZnT8 (Zinc Transporter 8), and precedes the onset of hyperglycemia by a few years.

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International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #7: Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Part 1 of 5

Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is one of the most prevalent severe chronic diseases of childhood, affecting more than 170,000 children in the United States, an increase of 23% since 2001. In the US, more than 25,000 children are diagnosed annually with 1:200 children and 1:100 adults diagnosed with T1DM during the lifespan.

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International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #6: Classification of Diabetes Mellitus and Other Categories of Glucose Intolerance Part 6 of 6

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) are categorized as stages in the natural history of disordered carbohydrate metabolism. They occur in all individuals as they progress from normal to diabetes, but since the transition through these states is rapid in type 1 diabetes, they are rarely identified in such individuals. Therefore, nearly all of the literature dealing with IGT and IFG is concerned with issues relating to type 2 diabetes, such as risk of developing type 2 diabetes and CVD.

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