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Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes Treatment and Research: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that destroys pancreatic beta cells. Once called juvenile diabetes, Type 1 is diagnosed most often in children, but can be expressed in adults as well. Incidence is highest among non-hispanic whites, according to the NDEP. Adults with Type 1 make up 5% of all diagnosed diabetes patients.New tools, techniques, treatments, drugs and devices can help you improve outcomes for your patients with Type 1.

Make Sure “Quick and Easy” Food Plans Meet Specific Patient Needs

19-year-old female, type 1, insulin pump, and counting carbs, wanted to use a particular food plan that touted no counting and no need to worry about numbers. She asked me what I thought of that and I informed her that for weight loss, this can work for some, but she has type 1 diabetes, and she will need to check her glucose and most likely count carbs, or at least make some adjustments in her boluses at each meal.

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International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #4: Classification of Diabetes Mellitus and Other Categories of Glucose Intolerance Part 4 of 6

There is accumulating evidence supporting an association of certain psychiatric conditions with type 2 diabetes which can be attributed to side-effects of treatment and a high baseline risk of diabetes in this patient group. Diabetes can be induced by the use of atypical antipsychotics including clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole. These drugs have a direct effect of raising blood glucose and also lead to weight gain, [48] which subsequently may increase blood glucose levels.

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Lowering Carbs Can Be Helpful Tool in Weight Loss for People with Insulin-Requiring Diabetes

Female, 28 years of age, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 25. She was taught to manage her diabetes with a basal/bolus insulin regimen and meal plan prescribed by health care team. She was taught she could eat anything she wanted as long as she covered her carbs with rapid-acting insulin. Her glucose was in control, but she gained 50 pounds over the first year. She then attributed her weight gain to taking insulin, so she would not take enough insulin to cover her glucose levels.

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International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #1: Classification of Diabetes Mellitus and Other Categories of Glucose Intolerance Part 1 of 6

A critical requirement for orderly epidemiologic, genetic and clinical research, and indeed for the management of diabetes mellitus and other forms of glucose intolerance is an appropriate classification system. Furthermore, a hallmark in the process of understanding the etiology of a disease and studying its natural history is the ability to identify and differentiate its various forms and place them into a rational etiopathologic framework.

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