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Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM

Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM
(Advisory Board Member) Sheri Colberg, PhD, also known as Sheri Colberg-Ochs, is an author, exercise physiologist, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University and a former adjunct professor of internal medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School, both in Norfolk, Virginia. Having earned her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, she has specialized in research on diabetes and exercise and healthy lifestyles and shaped physical activity recommendations for professional organizations, including the American College of Sports Medicine, American Diabetes Association, and American Association of Diabetes Educators. She has authored 11 books, along with 24 book chapters and more than 300 articles on physical activity, diabetes, healthy lifestyles, and aging. In addition to her educational website, Diabetes Motion (www.diabetesmotion.com), she is also the founder of an academy for fitness and other professionals seeking continuing education enabling them to effectively work with people with diabetes and exercise: Diabetes Motion Academy (www.dmacademy.com). These and her own website (www.shericolberg.com) offer additional information about being active with diabetes. She is the 2016 recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award.

Why I Count Calories, Not Just Carbs

Whenever someone gets diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) nowadays, the first thing that an educator or dietitian tries to teach them is how to count carbohydrates (carbs). Although I have been living with T1D now for almost half a century, I have to admit that I don’t count carbs. Not only that, but I personally don’t think carb counting works very well!

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Head Scratching Days with Insulin Action Changes

The topic of insulin action (resistance and sensitivity) has come up multiple times over the years in my articles, but it is admittedly much more complex than I often make it out to be. In a DIC article last summer, you can find a short list of all the factors that can potentially improve insulin action (basically insulin sensitivity). In reality, though, sometimes it is impossible to know exactly what is causing your reduced insulin action from day to day and how to easily and consistently manage it.

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How to Improve What Really Matters: Quality of Life, Not Longevity

For many years, I have focused on aspects of lifestyle and health management that can enhance quality of life, especially when living with a chronic disease like diabetes, rather than simply on living a long time (longevity). Much of my motivation is derived from the personal experience of watching my maternal grandmother suffer through six (long) years of severe disability related to cardiovascular complications of diabetes starting at the age of 70 that left her unable to feed herself or communicate, bed bound, and with almost no quality of life for her final six years of life. Really, what is the point of simply being alive when you’re really not experiencing life under such conditions?

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How to Be the Biggest Maintainer, Not Just the Biggest Loser

A recent study published in Obesity in May 2016 reported very discouraging findings for a group of participants who had lost weight on “The Biggest Loser” (TBL) reality TV show: not only did almost all of them regain a significant amount of weight over the 6-year period following the show, but they also had lower resting metabolic rates than expected for their body weights, even six years later. With the way the media ran with this story, it will not be a surprise if everyone just gives up staying thinner and blames excess weight on a faulty, and unchangeable, metabolism.

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The Conundrum Arising from Being Active and Getting Injured

You finally decide to get active to help manage your diabetes better or to prevent type 2 altogether, and once you’ve hit your stride, you get an injury that puts you back on the couch! Getting injured from being active happens often enough that you need to know how to prevent and treat injuries so you can stay on track. The best medicine is prevention, so trying to prevent injuries before they happen is the best way to avoid having to take time off from exercising and sidetracking your fitness program.

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What You Don’t Know About Statins and Exercise Can Hurt You

I recently received an email from a person with type 1 diabetes living in Denmark (Guido) whose physician believes in prescribing many medications to manage cholesterol and high blood pressure in anyone with diabetes, regardless of need. Guido has been taking a statin (Atorvastatin, brand name Lipitor), along with at least four others for blood pressure control. He used to take Simvastitin (Zocor), but a year prior had been changed to Atorvastatin (and his dose doubled). That’s when his problems with exercise began.

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What Motivates People to Use Technologies for Tracking Health?

As we all know, it is easy to start out with good intentions to be more active or manage diabetes better, but it’s much more difficult to follow through and stick with such changes so that they become sustainable. While some studies have recently shown that newer devices like the Fitbit can increase physical activity adherence, the real question is, will using the latest health information technologies be motivating enough for most people to continue doing it long-term?

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