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Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM

Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM
(Advisory Board Member) Sheri Colberg, PhD, also known as Sheri Colberg-Ochs, is an author, exercise physiologist, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University and a former adjunct professor of internal medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School, both in Norfolk, Virginia. Having earned her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, she has specialized in research on diabetes and exercise and healthy lifestyles and shaped physical activity recommendations for professional organizations, including the American College of Sports Medicine, American Diabetes Association, and American Association of Diabetes Educators. She has authored 11 books, along with 24 book chapters and more than 300 articles on physical activity, diabetes, healthy lifestyles, and aging. In addition to her educational website, Diabetes Motion (www.diabetesmotion.com), she is also the founder of an academy for fitness and other professionals seeking continuing education enabling them to effectively work with people with diabetes and exercise: Diabetes Motion Academy (www.dmacademy.com). These and her own website (www.shericolberg.com) offer additional information about being active with diabetes. She is the 2016 recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s Outstanding Educator in Diabetes Award.

What Do We Really Know About Exercising with Complications?

By Featured Writer Sheri R. Colberg, PhD. As a clinical exercise researcher, I frequently have found it difficult to study exercise effects in people with health complications, even though this is critical information to know in order to make appropriate exercise guidelines. Try convincing your university Institutional Research Board, or IRB, that it is advisable to exercise people with eye issues like unstable proliferative retinopathy to find out if breath-holding, jumping, jarring, or head-down activities cause them to experience retinal hemorrhages. Understandably, that is not going to happen, nor should it.

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…And Stay Active: A Profile in Living Successfully with Diabetes

I have been writing columns—mostly about physical activity and exercise—for this enewsletter for more than a decade, and I am grateful to DIC for allowing me to educate everyone on topics that I feel so strongly about. This month, I would like to switch gears a bit and share some of my personal story about why physical activity matters to me and how I have lived successfully with type 1 diabetes for almost 50 years to date.

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