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Production Assistant, Diabetes In Control

Diabetes Type 2 Guide

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin (a hormone made by the pancreas) to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use.

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International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #40: Normal Beta-cell Function Part 5 of 6

Beta-cell mass and function: beta-cell mass can be accurately evaluated only through autopsy studies. Complex in vivo tests aiming at measuring maximal secretory capacity combining different stimuli have been proposed as an alternative. However, their ability to discriminate between defects in function and mass, as well as their feasibility, is a matter of debate. As thoroughly reviewed by Robertson, the acute response to an i.v. glucose bolus in normoglycemic subjects and the acute response to an i.v. arginine bolus in hyperglycemic subjects do correlate with beta-cell mass.

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Question #849

Test Your Knowledge

Issue849Graph How good are you at interpreting graphs? Follow the link to see this graph at full size and indicate the parameter that best describes Curve 1. Is it: insulin secretion, postprandial glucose, fasting glucose, or insulin resistance?

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Lifestyle Changes

Do you think people who are prescribed a drug, like metformin, for prediabetes are more or less likely to make lifestyle changes that could help their prediabetes? Follow the link to share your opinion!

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Out of Insulin, Too Early to Renew — What To Do?

It is not unusual for people to have difficulty keeping insulin from freezing or getting overheated. A patient, with type 1 diabetes for 17 years, had glucose that did not respond to his rapid-acting insulin as it usually does. He had two new vials in the refrigerator. He took a new vial out of his refrigerator earlier in the day, and started using it a few hours after he took it out. Had high post prandials that did not respond as usual to correcting. He had enough experience to wonder if perhaps something was wrong with his new insulin, so he thought he’d try another vial. He saw it was frozen. He had put the two vials at the back, where for many refrigerators it is colder. He thought back and wondered if the first vial looked any different, but remembered, he did not look closely at it.

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Dr. Stanley Schwartz Part 1, New Diabetes Classification

In part 1 of this Exclusive Interview, Dr. Stanley Schwartz explains how the current understanding of diabetes surpasses the diabetes classifications determined long ago. He explains how understanding the inner workings of a specific patient can determine the best therapy for that patient, whether diabetes classifications change or stay the same.

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International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #39: Normal Beta-cell Function Part 4 of 6

Beta-Cell response to hormones and the nervous system: As already mentioned insulin is the only hormone with a blood glucose lowering effect, while many other hormones (glucagon, cortisol, adrenaline) exert a hyperglycemic action. The changes in glucose levels elicited by these hormones obviously will be detected by the beta cell, which will respond by enhancing insulin secretion. Yet, all these hormones, as well as others and the nervous system exert a coordinated direct effect on the beta cell resulting in an integrated and sophisticated control network.

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Question #848

Test Your Knowledge

Clinicians treating patients with type 2 diabetes should include lifestyle interventions when developing diabetes management plans. Which of the following is NOT appropriate? 1.Weight reduction, if necessary 2. A minimum of 150 minutes/week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity, spread over at least 3 days/week with no more than 2 consecutive days without exercise 3. Diabetes Self-Management Education & Support (DSME/DSMS) 4. A calorie fixed ADA diet 5. Individualized plan of calories including recommended amounts carbohydrates, fats, and proteins Do you have the right answer? Follow the link to find out!

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Diabetic Coach

Would you know what to do in a diabetic seizure emergency situation? There are simple solutions to ensuring you have what it takes to help a family member, co-worker, child, or stranger in need of emergency first aid.

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