Tuesday , January 23 2018
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Production Assistant, Diabetes In Control

Additional Testing

Which additional test do you prefer to use when doing a physical exam? 1. A fasting blood glucose 2. An A1c 3. Neither Follow the link to share your opinion!

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International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #81: Insulin Actions In Vivo: Glucose Metabolism Part 7 of 9

Cellular, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms of insulin action: The insulin receptor is a glycoprotein consisting of two alpha subunits and two beta subunits linked by disulfide bonds and expresses insulin-stimulated kinase activity directed towards its own tyrosine residues. Insulin receptor phosphorylation of the α subunit, with subsequent activation of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, represents the first step in the action of insulin on glucose metabolism.

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Statins and Exercise: Revisited

I chronicled someone with type 1 diabetes whose ability to exercise was compromised by his use of statins back in April 2016. As you know, statins are a class of medications prescribed to lower cholesterol levels or abnormal levels of blood fats, with the goal being a reduction in the risk of heart attack and stroke. Brand name examples of statin medications include Altoprev, Crestor, Lescol, Lipitor, Livalo, Mevacor, Pravachol, and Zocor.

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Type 2 Blood Sugar Monitoring

How often do you recommend to your patients with type 2 who do not take insulin that they monitor their blood glucose? 1) Once daily in the AM 2) Twice daily in the AM and after 1 meal 3) 3 or 4 times daily 2 to 3 times a week 4) Other Follow the link to see how you compare to your colleagues.

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International Textbook of Diabetes Mellitus, 4th Ed., Excerpt #80: Insulin Actions In Vivo: Glucose Metabolism Part 6 of 9

Intravenous glucose: In the presence of euglycemia, insulin displays a potent suppressive action on hepatic glucose production, such that portal insulin concentrations of less than 100 mU L−1 abolish glucose entry into the circulation. Figure 14.7 shows a typical time course for endogenous glucose production following an acute increase in plasma insulin to levels of 60 – 70 mU L−1 in a healthy subject.

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