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Eric S. Freedland, MD

Eric S. Freedland, MD

Eric S. Freedland, MD graduated from University of Rochester School of Medicine in 1982, trained in internal medicine at Mt. Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, MA, and emergency medicine at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, CA, and has held faculty positions at Harvard Medical School (1990-1991) and Boston University School of Medicine (1992-1997). Dr. Freedland has developed a nutrition-centered model of disease with a special emphasis on diabetes. A staunch advocate for prescribing lifestyle changes before drugs, Dr. Freedland has written and lectured extensively on this subject.

Fats and Cholesterol Omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratio

The increased prevalence of diabetes has paralleled a rise in consumption of n-6 (relative to n-3) fatty acids and trans fatty acids found in partially hydrogenated oil. 66-68 Both can change cellular membrane phospholipid composition and decrease fluidity—a state associated with altered insulin receptors, decreased insulin sensitivity, and subsequent insulin …

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Measuring endothelial function

The endothelium’s functioning is not yet routinely tested. Most of the practical techniques for directly measuring this activity use ultrasound to measure movement of blood in an artery after the flow has been altered either by injecting drugs that would normally dilate it, or by blocking the flow with a …

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Insulin’s contribution to obesity

Insulin itself may contribute to obesity. A high first-phase insulin response to intravenous glucose has been shown to be a risk factor for long-term weight gain, and this effect is particularly manifested in insulin-sensitive individuals. 76 Also, compared to normal children, Pima Indian children with elevated fasting insulin gain more …

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Diabetes and vascular disease — a single process?

Each hour, 178 people die from complications set off by diabetes. For 80 percent of these patients the killer is atherosclerosis involving the large blood vessels supplying heart and brain. Patients with diabetes are four times as likely as nondiabetic individuals to die of an MI. With endothelial dysfunction a …

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More Evidence of The Single Disease Process.

Nitric oxide (NO) A diabetic environment high in free radicals and low in antioxidants may disrupt endothelial function. A highly active regulatory organ, the endothelium senses and assesses signals to which it is constantly exposed by the blood, and responds by secreting factors that affect blood vessels’ tone and structure. …

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“Because The Light’s Better Here!”

A woman offered to help a man who, on his hands and knees under a street lamp, was frantically searching for his lost key. Frustrated after several unsuccessful minutes crawling under the bright light, the woman asked, “Where were you when you lost your key?” Pointing to a dark alley, …

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