Sign up for our complimentary
weekly e-journal

Main Newsletter
Mastery Series
Therapy Series
 
Bookmark and Share | Print Article | Items for the Week Previous | All Articles This Week | Next
This article originally posted and appeared in  CardiovascularMedicationMen's HealthIssue 652

Multivitamins Do Not Reduce Cardiovascular Events

A study with 15,000 middle-aged male physicians using multivitamins for more than 10 years showed no benefit in reducing cardiovascular events....

Advertisement

In a study that included nearly 15,000 male physicians who were middle-aged or older, daily multivitamin use for more than 10 years of treatment and follow-up did not result in a reduction of major cardiovascular events, heart attack, stroke, or death from cardiovascular disease.

"Despite uncertainty regarding the long-term health benefits of vitamins, many U.S. adults take vitamin supplements to prevent chronic diseases or for general health and well-being," according to background information in the article. Individuals who believe they are deriving benefits from supplements may be less likely to engage in other preventive health behaviors. "Although multivitamins are used prevent vitamin and mineral deficiency, there is a perception that multivitamins may prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Observational studies have shown inconsistent associations between regular multivitamin use and CVD, with no long-term clinical trials of multivitamin use."

Howard D. Sesso, Sc.D., M.P.H., of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues analyzed data regarding multivitamin use and major cardiovascular events from the Physicians' Health Study (PHS) II, a large-scale trial testing the effects of long-term use of a common multivitamin on the risk of major cardiovascular events and cancer. The Physicians' Health Study II is a randomized, placebo-controlled trial that began in 1997 with continued treatment and follow-up through June 1, 2011. A total of 14,641 male U.S. physicians initially 50 years of age or older (average, 64 years), including 754 men with a history of CVD at randomization, were enrolled. This analysis measured the composite end point of major cardiovascular events, including nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI; heart attack), nonfatal stroke, and death from CVD. Secondary outcomes included heart attack and stroke individually. Participants were randomized to multivitamin (n = 7,317) or placebo (n = 7,324). 

During a median (midpoint) follow-up of 11.2 years, 1,732 men had major cardiovascular events, including 652 cases (first events) of heart attack and 643 cases of stroke, and 829 men had cardiovascular death, with some men experiencing multiple events. A total of 2,757 (18.8 percent) men died during follow-up (multivitamin, n = 1,345; placebo, n = 1,412). In an analysis of the rate of events for men in each group, the researchers found that there was no significant effect of a daily multivitamin on major cardiovascular events, or total MI or total stroke. Taking a daily multivitamin was not significantly associated with a reduction in CVD mortality. There were fewer total deaths among multivitamin users, but this difference was not statistically significant.

The authors also found no significant effect of a daily multivitamin on rates of congestive heart failure, angina, and coronary revascularization. Also, the effect of a daily multivitamin on total MI, total stroke, and other cardiovascular end points did not differ between men with and without CVD at the beginning of the study.

The authors write, "The PHS II represents to our knowledge the only large-scale, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial testing the long-term effects of a commonly available multivitamin in the prevention of chronic disease." "These data do not support multivitamin use to prevent CVD, demonstrating the importance of long-term clinical trials of commonly used nutritional supplements. Whether to take a daily multivitamin requires consideration of an individual's nutritional status, because the aim of supplementation is to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiency, plus consideration of other potential effects, including a modest reduction in cancer and other important outcomes in PHS II that will be reported separately."

JAMA.2012;308[17]:1751-1760.  

Advertisement


 

Bookmark and Share | Print | Category | Home

This article originally posted 15 November, 2012 and appeared in  CardiovascularMedicationMen's HealthIssue 652

Past five issues: SGLT-2 Inhibitors Special Edition July 2015 | Diabetes Clinical Mastery Series Issue 251 | Issue 791 | Diabetes Clinical Mastery Series Issue 250 | GLP-1 Special Editions July 2015 |

2015 Most Popular Articles:

Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose: The Patient's Perspective
Posted July 10, 2015
The Impact of Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonists on Weight Reduction
Posted July 10, 2015
Vitamin D3 Supplementation and Weight Loss Prevent Cancer in Older Women
Posted July 10, 2015
Diet That Mimics Fasting Appears to Slow Aging
Posted July 03, 2015
Evaluation of Cellphone Application that Records Readings from Glucometer
Posted July 10, 2015
GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Reduce Bone Loss During Weight Loss
Posted July 17, 2015
Metformin May Increase Mortality in Advanced CKD among Type 2 Patients
Posted July 10, 2015
Can the Insulin Patch Become a Reality?
Posted July 03, 2015
Ancestral Diets Can Determine Vulnerability to Type 2 Diabetes
Posted July 17, 2015
New Evidence Suggests Pioglitazone Reduces Dementia Risk 42%
Posted July 03, 2015


Browse by Feature Writer & Article Category.
A. Lee Dellon, MD | Aaron I. Vinik, MD, PhD, FCP, MACP | Beverly Price | Charles W Martin, DD | Derek Lowe, PhD | Dr. Brian Jakes, Jr. | Dr. Fred Pescatore | Dr. Tom Burke, Ph.D | Eric S. Freedland | Evan D. Rosen | Ginger Kanzer-Lewis | Greg Milliger | Kristina Sandstedt | Laura Plunkett | Leonard Lipson, M.A. | Louis H. Philipson | Maria Emanuel Ryan, DDS, PhD | Marilyn Porter, RD, CDE | Melissa Diane Smith | Michael R. Cohen, RPh, MS, ScD, FASHP | Paul Chous, M.A., OD | Philip A. Wood PhD | R. Keith Campbell, Professor, B.Pharm, MBA, CDE | Richard K. Bernstein, MD | Sheri R. Colberg PhD | Sherri Shafer | Stanley Schwartz, MD, FACP, FACE | Steve Pohlit | Steven V. Edelman, M.D. | Timothy S. Hollingshead |

Cast Your Vote
Do you have any patients on a dual therapy of a DPP-4 and a SGLT-2 who have reached their goal A1c?

CME/CE of the Week
Dr. Michael Miller, Dr. Sergio Fazio, and Dr. Roger Blumenthal

Category: Cardiology
Credits:
 1