Monday , October 23 2017
Home / Resources / Articles / Are Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetics at Increased Risk for Urinary Tract Infections?

Are Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetics at Increased Risk for Urinary Tract Infections?

Recent studies have suggested that urinary tract infections are more commonly experienced by patients with type 2 diabetes compared to those without…. 

Although the exact mechanism is unknown, there are several possible explanations for the association between diabetes and UTIs. One theory is that damage to the genitourinary system as a result of diabetic neuropathy could lead to a dysfunctional bladder creating more opportunity for infection. The presence of higher glucose concentrations in the urine may present another possible pathway by allowing for increased bacterial reproduction and a favorable environment for infections. Last, impaired immune response may play a role in a patient’s decreased ability to fight off bacteria.

A retrospective, matched cohort study was done to examine the prevalence, incidence, and risk of urinary tract infections in subjects with and without newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Subjects included in the study were over the age of 18 with newly diagnosed type 2 DM, between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2010. These patients were compared to those without type 2 diabetes, defined as no diagnoses of the disorder or any history of antihyperglycemic medication use between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011. For the subjects with diabetes, an index date of the day of diagnosis in 2010 was given, while those without the disease were randomly assigned an index date in 2010. Subjects were then matched (1:1) by index date, age, gender, urban/rural location, and region.

A total of 179,580 subjects were included in the analysis. Subjects were followed for one year from their index date to determine whether a UTI event had occurred. Subjects with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes had more pre-existing comorbid condition compared to subjects without the disease, and also had a higher rate of baseline UTIs (8.4% vs. 5.4%).

During the one year follow up period, 7.6% of subjects were diagnosed with a UTI. The diagnosis was more common in patients with type 2 diabetes than those without (9.4% vs. 5.7%). Recurrence of UTI was also higher in subjects with type 2 DM than in those without (1.6% vs. 0.6%).

After stratifying by age, the likelihood of experiencing UTI for those with type 2 DM compared to those without type 2 DM was shown to decrease from younger to older age groups.

What this study ultimately shows is a 54% increased risk of UTI among patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes when compared to those without.

Practice Pearls:

  • Baseline occurrence of UTI as well as recurrence is more common in patients with type 2 diabetes than patients without.
  • There is a 54% increased risk of UTI among patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes when compared to those without.

Fu, Alex Z, Iglay, Kristy, Qiu, Ying, et al. Risk Characterization for Urinary Tract Infections in Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes. Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications. June 17, 2014. Accessed on July 4, 2014 from http://www.jdcjournal.com/article/S1056-8727(14)00189-5/fulltext